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On the road, Andy makes a quick dish for the crew on the beach. In Mullumbimby, he visits Tim Brebner’s Milk & Honey Pizzeria. After a few stops to cook with the best of the local offerings, he crosses the border into QLD as the journey continues!

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Transcript

- ♪ You're infectious and you're reckless ♪ ♪ You don't care and that's all right ♪ - I couldn't come to Byron without visiting this place. Now the farm is set on 87 acres of land, just outside of Byron. My buddies at Three Blue Ducks, they have the restaurant on site here, and if you've been here before you probably already know, it absolutely humps. There's a lot of moving parts to this beast. I'm gonna say hello to a few of my friends and show you around this joint. - Andy! - Now can you save me one of those bad boys for later on? Sweet. Addy. - Hello mate. - Hey legend. - How are you? - Really good, really good. - That's good, should have come when the wind wasn't blowing northeast. - No you need to go, you want that, that Beyonce vibe. - Yeah we need Beyonce vibe. Come over this side, boys. Looking for Beyonce. - Oh Adam, how are you? Hey, how are you? Nice to see you. Great, ah see you. Andy, hello, how are you, mate? - Hi, nice to see you. - So we keep, the bar is absolutely humping. We go a kitchen on our right-hand side and this is kind of where I got my taste in opening a place up. I came up here and gave the guys a hand when we opened up about a year and a half ago now. I'm gonna go and have a chat to Jono about the farm and then do a bit of cooking, so follow me. How are you? - Hello, mate. - What's happening? - How are ya? - Good to see ya. - You too. ♪ I wonder about ♪ - General Manager now mate, you're a big dog. - The top dog, yeah mate. - Big dog. - It's pretty cool. - So mate, before we head out to the field, we're gonna chat about this one. - Yep, we've gotta chat about Braveheart. Unfortunately, mom rejected him. He's four days old, Scottish Highlander. - 'Ello. - He's doing pretty well. - 'Ello. - He's on the bottle at the moment, so I just gotta keep his food in, take-in and-- - Probably the cutest thing I've ever seen in my life. - It's surreal, isn't it? But lugging him from here to home every night and up every two hours feeding him all night. It's good fun. - So mate, apart from this guy. You got a bunch of things going on at the farm. - Yep. - I reckon the best thing is we get out there, have a look around, you can chat to me on the way-- - [Jono] Yeah definitely. - About what's going on. - [Jono] We started growing for Liberation Larder here. - Yeah. We get about a thousand kilos of potatoes and sweet potatoes and pumpkins for 'em, to feed the homeless. - [Andy] Wow, that's pretty cool. - [Jono] That's the next level. So this is the market garden, mate. We're pretty lucky, we get about two 2.5 meters of rainfall a year, it always a rain. Can I say, the sorrel electric. There's something in here that just makes veggies jump out of the ground. - Yeah, right. - I'm telling all the three independent farmers when they're planting something, expect double the yield-- - [Andy] Really? - Just in this region. It's just unreal to see frigging crates of produce. - Be nothing better. - It's 300 meters from here to the restaurant and it's no longer than three days from harvest to consumption in the kitchen. Is there carrots? We got two rows, and then in between we got the beetroot. So, you'll be able to find some in here, right on the edge line just there. Fare few good ones, you just gotta look for the root stop and the thicker the root stop at the base. - The bigger, the carrot. I'm pulling out absolute midgets over here. - We can go to the next one, there are some others. Go up here, there'll be some-- - Gonna just put that one back back in. Mate, size definitely matters when you picking veggies. Oh, medium. - That's what you want. I take kids around for school group tours. - Yeah. - And we start ripping carrots out. They lose it, some kids don't even know how carrots are grown out of the ground, so-- - Yeah. - To have that experience to see 'em end up on the menu in the restaurant once they've picked 'em, it's pretty clever. - Well hello. - I'll get you that French sorrel on the way, mate. - Mate, this this dish has to, is that my only, like, you have to do this? Put French sorrel in your dish, mate. - Yeah, it's... Oh, this is the stuff, mate. - This is the stuff, we found the French sorrel. - You've gotta get into it. - Mate, it's that acidic, how good's that? - It's what you want. I think I've sold you on it, now you know what I was ravin' on about. - Yeah, we'll make a little vinegarette out for the charred carrots. Dressing goes well with it. Put the carrots over the coals, see what else we can find out here. - Look at that, that'll do. - As far as cooking locations go, it does not get much better. It's a little cliche, we're surrounded by macadamia trees down at the farm. There's kids running around, cracking macadamias. I've taken a little inspo from that and come up with this dish on the spot. So we've got our wood fire barbie and we're gonna do a charred carrot dish, with some dates, some macadamias, a little herb dressing and some Parmigiano Reggiano. Let's do it. And now our old favorite, a jar. 'Cause I love dressings in jars. To emulsify this guy, we've got some dijon mustard. We're going straight in with about a teaspoon and a half of that. Our acid, apple cider vinegar, about 30 ml and the juice of a lemon. From there, we're going with my rule of thumb. What's my rule of thumb for a dressing? One part acid, to two parts olive oil or fat. We don't really need to measure it, because look, because it's not emulsified yet, you get your acid on the bottom, and you get your fat that rises to the top. 'Cause I'm gonna chop coriander, parsley and garlic and that's going in. Now I need a clove of garlic and we want that minced up. Super-duper fine. Let's just put a bit of salt over the top of the garlic and then mince it down with the back of our knife. That's gonna give it a little bit of heat to the dressing, it can go in. Good crack of black pepper, whack of sea salt. Lid on, and then shake. That's our dressing done. So that's gonna be acidic, it's gonna be punchy, it's gonna be packed with herbs and that's gonna go really well against these guys, it's gonna be charred, it's gonna be sweet, so we're trying to balance this dish all out. I thought we can't find any, hey? All the kids have got 'em. There's no point following me, I can't actually find any. Oh, yeah. That was easy. Let me tell you what's happened to these, 'cause yes, they were pulled out of the garden just up there, parboil them and then we can get a nice char of the outside. They'll be cooked fully. Salt, olive oil and then this is just basically so that the heat has something to latch onto, so it's not that dry carrot in there. The olive oil transfers the heat from the barbecue to the carrot. And now let's get our fire sorted. So I've got a good coal amount here. I'm just gonna break them down. Let's get 'em on, let's get 'em on. So carrots, onto our coals. This excites me, this is how cooking should be. In all seriousness though, this is pretty cool. That stuff was in the ground just up there, like an hour ago and now it's sitting over coals and about to get eaten. Yep, like that. Oh, the higher you get, the more epic it looks. Let's get all the other ingredients in our salad, in our bowl. Dates, I'm just gonna rip the seeds out and then just roughly tear those little bits of sweetness that'll pop throughout our salad. Maccas, just halve 'em. They can go straight in. Let's get some of these smaller guys. Quite honestly, you know that's gonna be good. And then, Jono's best mate, our sorrel, those leaves can just go on top. Salt, obviously, black pepper. And then our dressing over the top. Really gently just toss that around and then let's go onto our plate. So let's just go with a bit of that dressing. And then finally, just some Parmigiano Reggiano, that's just gonna give it a bit of extra bite. I think you can tell how bloody happy I am. I could not do a show about Australia's menu, without coming to this place, the farm. For me, this is what it's all about. Getting produce out of the ground up there, and putting it on a plate right there. That's it. - [Cameraman] You might burn the joint down. - You've seen it and you've heard it, it is blowing an absolute gale outside, so we've bunkered down in the shed to cook a pork belly dish. This isn't just any pork belly dish. We've got some pork from Bangalow, it's super, super tasty and we're gonna make a beer and maple glazed pork belly. But before we get to that step, it's about cooking the pork belly in a master stock. This is everything that is going into our master stock. I've got three liters plain old tap water onto our stove. I've got 125ml of light soy and about 50-60ml of dark. What we're trying to do here is get as much flavor into our stock, so that anything that goes in there gets flavor put inside it. I've got two spring onions or shallots, whatever you wanted to call them, they can just get roughly chopped, roots and all. In they go. I got a chili. I'm just gonna halve this baddie. Straight in. Ginger, a nice thumb, just roughly chop that. Bang that in. Garlic, couple of cloves, just bash it with the side of your knife. That'll release all that flavor. Bang them in. Star anise, just that nice aniseed flavor. Got about three of those. Let's get the peel of about half an orange. And see all those little spurts that are coming up? That's exactly what we want, that's the natural oils. Roots and stalks of two coriander bunches. They can go in. And then a cinnamon stick. All I'm gonna do, is just lean on that to open that quill up, and then pop that in. We get that up to a boil and leave it for 30 minutes so all those flavors can release into that stock. I knew I forgot something. Tablespoon of salt, throw it in like you're angry, 30 minutes, come back. Pork, probably the most important part of this recipe. And all we're going to do is chop into some nice 2.5cm cubes, then we're gonna poach it in our master stock. And you can see there, that's the definition of a good-looking piece of pork. A really nice deep pink color and with those fat lines just running straight through the belly, that's healthy piece of pig. Pork, that's the first step. Pretty simple, put the pork belly in the pot. We're gonna cook that for 45 minutes, so it's just tender and then the real fun begins. - 45 minutes later, we have master stock braised pork belly. You could eat it straight like that. What's better than that? Glaze it in beer and maple syrup. So this is the part where you take something that's already bloody delicious and make it so that everyone that comes over doesn't even know what to say, 'cause it's so good. That's what I'm looking for. Beer and maple glaze. You need a good Aussie pale. Let's get about a 100ml into our pan. Let's go 200ml of maple syrup. And this little baddie, I've got a tablespoon dijon mustard, 40ml of soy and I have two tablespoons of brown sugar. Get that in. Half a tablespoon of fish sauce, get a little bit of salty salty in there. And then bang in the juice of a lime. Oh man, oh man, oh man. Bring it up to the boil, reduce it for about 10 minutes, it's gonna get all sticky and juicy and epic. Then we're gonna roll our pork belly in it, and then we're gonna have a real good time. We're gonna make a salad of it's not salad. We're gonna make a little red, we're gonna make a little citrus-- - [Cameraman] Isn't it slaw? - We're gonna make a citrus slaw, with purple cabbage. Has very little ingredients in it, so watch this. Quarter purple cabbage on the mandolin, or as fine as you can. Into the bowl. Next, one long red chili. Slice it up, super fine. Put it in the bowl. One spring onion, you guessed it, super fine. - [Cameraman] Where is that going, Andy? - Put it in the bowl. Who's coming for a little taster? - [Cameraman] Me. - SHouldn't be too bad. - Delicious. - He says delicious-- - [Cameraman] Every time. - With everything. - Little bit of coriander, not so fine. We're just gonna run our knife through it, so it's still got a bit of texture. In the bowl. The juice of a lime, see if I can get this right. Yeah. A little lug of our good mate, olive oil. And then, just a touch of salt to season the bad boy up. Give that a mix and what this is gonna do, it's gonna slightly pickle everything that's in there. It's gonna make it nice and vibrant and super crunchy. Our beer and maple glaze is a beer and maple glaze to freshen it up, we're going in with a little bit of microplaned fresh ginger. Our pork can go in to this goodness. I'm gonna coat the pork, so every little layer gets some of that glaze on it. Let's plate this baddie up. Now, in with our salad first, you can just line one side of the plate and then let's rock our beer and maple glazed pork belly. Then, let's just go, because we can, let's do one of these ones. We're going a couple of shallots around the plate and then last but not least, some fried eschies Beer and maple glazed pork belly in Byron Bay. If it gets any better, show me. Alright. What're we doing, Rob? What's happening? - We're gonna pick some potatoes, with the man, Johnny Cut. - So have you got your menu sorted yet, or what? Or is this basically-- - This is what I do, I walk around and then whatever's good. People get to eat it. - And that's legit, like, so many chefs are out, but this looks pretty legit. Hey Sue. Johnny. Alright. - These are King Edwards. - Yeah. - So they actually make the best roast potatoes ever. - Everyone hates roast potatoes, don't they? - [Johnny] You just stick your finger in. - [Andy] Oh, look at that thing. - Yeah, so every Monday morning, I come up between this Johnny and another Johnny and just work out what I'm gonna cook. And I come up here when I just need sanity from the whole food scene in this country. - Yeah, right. - So Johnny-- - What's that, why's he come here? What does Johnny do for ya? - You've only met him for about five minutes and you already love him-- - Man, I'm hooked. - I don't have to do anything, these guys do all the hard work. If they've done a shit job, then my food's shit, but-- - So it all depends on you. - No, it really does. The farmers, they're the backbones. - Righto, let's go put this menu together, Rob. - Yep. Doing the hurdles. Usain Bolt over here, whooh. So let's just pick a but of white Russian, bit of cavolo nero. - Okay. So Rob, you're over in London for a while, yeah? - I was. - How's the food scene? - I was very lucky to score myself a job in one of my favorite restaurants, the River Cafe. - Yeah? - The River Cafe. So I was living in Sicily before that, hanging out cooking-- - Oh, you've had a shit life, mate. - I know, just riding around, drinking coffee, working in a little restaurant. And then I went to London just to do a start at the cafe there and I didn't leave. Ended up staying there for two and a half years. - Really? - Yeah. So, yeah, I did that, and it was epic. - Yeah. - And that's what it's all about. They're just all about produce. Just getting the best ingredients that you can. - [Andy] Yeah. - [Rob] Got nothing to do with bells and whistles or you know, chef hats and Michelin stars and all that. - [Andy] It's just tasty food. - [Rob] Yeah. - You want an apple? - Yep. - [Rob] Red or green? - Greeny please, yours got dirt all over it. - What? - That one. - Yeah, I dropped it. - I thought you were gonna keep smashing it. - Where are we? - Wollongbar. - Ah, got ya. That's a good apple. - Yeah. - What time do we start tomorrow, at 7:00? 7:00 at the markets. - Yeah, we're gonna make a little bruschetta with melanzane a funghetto. and actually it's a recipe from one of the little chefs at the River Cafe. - Oh, sick. - So, I've got this book at home, so when I went traveling-- - Hey, this like your little black book. - And every person I stopped with, they had to write a recipe in. - Yeah. - It's my favorite cookbook. Hands, down, it's awesome. - That's such a good idea. - I'm just doing an omelet. = With spuds. - I'll just boil the potatoes and then just heaps of different herbs. - Ah, how good is this? - Yeah, that's my kitchen. - Mate, you have got it down. - This is it. Welcome home. And this is my assistant Michelle. - How are you? - The one who does all the work, not me. - Nice to meet you Michelle. - Nice to meet you. - How's it going? - Yeah, good thanks. - Good? - Good. - The black book? - The black book. All the good Spanish stuff. - [Andy] That's sick. - And then like in Sicily, I went and, this is all our family and stuff. We're gonna cook something out of this one today. We're gonna do, this is the funghetto. - Funghetto. - So eggplant and a side of mushroom. So we'll do that. That should be good. But, we'll cut 'em all. - Yeah. - We're gonna lace this with oregano and dried chili and olive oil and then we'll sit 'em all on. And then do along the top again. - Got ya. - If you did this, like in the wood over, it's so much better. - Yeah, I was thinking that. - It's designed for a wood oven. Throw clean olive oil down. Go up, just crunch it on. There we go, that'll do. - [Andy] Garlic? Do you want the garlic chopped or-- - Few slices, I don't need too much. - Yeah. - Sprinkle that on, a bit like that. Yep, bit of chili. Get there. Pepper, jaws, oh the salt. We're right. Plenty of olive oil. - You are Italian. - Little Alright, go more olive oil. You need the olive oil. You not gonna have olive oil on it, it's pointless. - Oohmba! - [Rob] There we go, make it rain. - [Andy] Make it rain. - Bit of chili, salt and pepper again. - Yeah. I think it's allowing for the wind. - Yeah. And then when these are all collapsed down, we'll fry off, garlic, capers and anchovies. - Yep. - Add the eggplant, add the tomato, and then Tamara will add fresh parsley. On a piece of toast. - That sounds so good. - In a tent. - Yeah. - At a market. - Loving life. - [Cameraman] Hey, can you check the cable in that top-down? Can do a top-down. Is that enough already? - New day. We're at New Brighton Farmers Market. I'm just about to go in there, service with cuzzie Rob. I think we're gonna get pumped. Morning Robbie. - Andy, morning. - How are ya? - Good, good, good. This is us today. - Where am I? - You're here. - What do you want me on? - You're on the pans. I'll get you an apron. - Yes! - And you, easy menu today, as you saw yesterday. - [Andy] Potatoes-- - [Rob] And an omelet. - How many do you reckon we'll do today? - Ah, who knows. Let's say 40, 50. - Cause you're here, probably 10. - Probably 10. Thanks, mate. - So when you get an omelet, that's your bowl. Two eggs, put a fork through it, bit of salt, bit of pepper, put it in the pan. Don't break my pan. - Oh, his pan, it's his grandmother's pan. - It's my grandmother's fry pan, so. - So I can break anything else, but the pan. - Yep. - What've you got? - Three already. - I'm scared. We've got three omelets already. He's done a few of them before. - Once it's on, it's on. - We're on, I think we're on. - [Rob] Yep, toast on there. Sweet, done. Then we'll do one more, and then you're cooking. Beautiful, here you go. - Is that enough? - Yeah. - It's alright, that can be for us to taste. - It was going so well. That's for staffies. - Yep, that's staffie. Alright, game on, go, go, go. - Guys, I'm not doing well in the omelet section. - You'll be right. - Far out. - [Cameraman] You have this, man. - No, I don't have this, I told you yesterday, I hate making omelets. - That's not an omelet, we'll call it a frittata. Just roll the pan like , that's it. You're doing it. - I'm not confident, hey? - I'm not gonna lie, it's not the easiest to do. - Mate, you've done about a thousand of these, I can tell. - More than that. That's awesome. There you go. - One more, I'll make straight up. - Yeah. - Yes chef. I'm not leaving until I've got the perfect omelet. That is not the perfect omelet. No. - Boom. That's alright, don't worry about it, it's rusty. - My grandmother would be proud. - Shit, I'm not. - You've got another four, man. - Alright, they're gonna get better. - That's alright, that's alright. - How many have we got? Another four? - Oh, around about seven. - Seven? - How you going Andy? - I'm good, I'm good. Keep talking to me though, 'cause when I go quiet I'm not in a good space. The 50-year-old pan, I'm starting to work it out now. Got a deep hole in the middle, which, you gotta be careful with that, but, you see if I break this, he'll break me. Mate, the camera's on, I've gotta get this one perfect. - You're not nervous, come on bro. - Are we tied on that? - Yeah, Bob wants an omelet, you don't wanna upset Bob. Bob's the coffee man. That's it, look at that. Beautiful. - Bloody hell. - [Rob] There it is, man. - Yee hee hee. Could have omelets on the menu really soon. Yes, no worries. Coming up now. Rob I've got a pretty hectic line, hey? - [Rob] I know, it's alright. - [Andy] Your grandma doesn't have a second pan, does she? - [Rob] No, no. You'll be alright. - So my time in the Nomadic Kitchen has come to an end. Cuzzie Rob. - Right, you have been sterling. - Don't say that, mate. - Sterling. The first time was a bit shaky. - Hey, how's that first time, it looked like a dog's breakfast. - Well. - But again, it's like, show's all about Australia's menu and this is definitely a part of Australia's menu. I got Rob, who's doing his thing, doing it the right way, I think it's really, really important to see. Everyone's frothing over the food, too. - Ah. - [Andy] Which is the most important bit. - Thank the farmers for that one, don't thank me. They're the key to everything. - Thanks for having me brother. - Right, thank you. - It was really good. - Awesome. - I learnt a lot. I learnt how to man an omelet station. - You did well. - How many you reckon we pumped out? - Ooh, easily 60. - What? - Easily. - No way, in two hours. - Yep, easily. - Cuzzie Rob, what an absolute cracker of a dude. Journey continues though. Let's keep going north. I'm gonna do a road trip further into Queensland. I need some snacks, and I love cured meats. So everyone I've talked to said, we've gotta visit the Salumi brothers. We're gonna go straight to the source. And see what the boys have got for me for a little snack bag. How are you mate? - Good man, nice to meet you. - Yeah, you too. Really good, really good. - Are you ready? - Man, I'm ready, what've I gotta do? Lots to do. - Alright, ready? Okay, just-- - Oh, yeah. - Welcome to the tunnel of meat. - Oh, shit yeah. - Go on. - Rightio, what've we got? - That's the ciale, guanciale. - Yeah, guanciale, that's my favorite right there. - Then we've got some pancetta there. - Oh. - What've we got on the outside? - That's the pepper crust and this is the 'nduja. - Spread that on some toast, it's so good. It's got a kick to it, hey? It's pretty spicy. - Yeah. We can move on to this other room. - Oh ho. Where's all your pigs come from? - [Massimiliano] Well we try to use as much as we can local, but yeah... - Mate, can you set me up with a goodie bag? - Ooh, I think I can. - Yeah? Alright. - You like the 'nduja, so-- - Oh, please. - Good, this is sausage a sarda, this is my grandmother's recipe, my nonna. - How good's that? - And this is just a simple, plain salami, just with a bit of red wine, pepper. - Not joking, there's nothing more that I like, than a salami. - Beautiful. Me too. And over here, this nice crustini. - [Andy] Yeah. - [Massimiliano] Thinly slice. - Mate, that is going straight on a piece of toast-- - And that's it. - For breakfast tomorrow. - Beautiful. - Thank you so much. - Pleasure. - Really appreciate that. - Anytime. - [Andy] Road trip. How good's life?