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Andy harvests CBD honey at Bee One Third in Brisbane and clinks cocktails with Urbane owner/chef Alejandro Cancino at Eleven rooftop bar. Later, Andy heads to the scenic rim and visits Australian Lime Caviar Company in Rathdowney, finally creating a gorgeous meal of honey glazed pork neck at Falls Farm.

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Transcript

- Briso, Briso. Yesterday left Brunswick Heads. Punched up to Briso. How many times do you think I can say Briso? - [Man] Who calls it Briso? - Briso? Everyone calls it Briso. I actually haven't spent much time in Briso. So I'm gonna see a few sights, meet a few people. Then my first little destination, I'm gonna hook up with a guy. Jack, how are you mate? - Not bad, how are you? - Really good. - Excellent. - Who's a bee keeper. But he does it on the roof tops of hotels and other different structures around the city. So we're hopefully gonna go see some bees. Get to know the bees. Extract the bee's honey. So we'll go and meet up with him. See how honey's produced. Yeah, sweet. - Anyone wearing really vibrant deodorant? They love the smell of flowers and deodorant. - Yeah, I smell like a man. - [Jack] Awesome all right. - Is that seriously it? - Yeah well I mean, I can take a couple of stings. She's a pretty good little-- - [Andy] Are these all you? - Yeah, this is all me. I tend to take care of the gardens every now and again. But the bees are predominantly me in the back end. So you can see where they're entering and exiting. - [Andy] So just that little hole down the bottom? - Just this little hole, yeah. And the slightly larger one back there. So they've got inner frames that are built up of, I guess, structured honeycombs. - Yeah. - And they build that through collecting nectar. They fly up to five kilometers from these hives, in search of food. - Really? - Yeah, yeah. They'll visit anywhere between 250 to 500 flowers in one visit. - No way. - And do about 20 to 30 visits a day. - And the last question I wanna ask, is this gonna get pretty hectic? - It can definitely be pretty confronting looking inside a beehive. And especially when the bees get a little bit rattled up. - There's one on the back of my head right now. - Oh really? - Yeah. Ah, let's do it. Let's do this before I freak out any more. - [Jack] All right, there's your tool. - [Andy] What do I do with this? - Here's mine, we're gonna crank up the smoker and we're gonna have a look inside the hive. - Okay. - [Jack] So in the natural environment, smoke is a warning signal. That there's a bushfire coming. - [Andy] Yeah. - So they fill their stomachs with honey. Which makes them very heavy and docile. - Hey if one does go one me, do I just leave it there? - Just leave it. They have no desire to hurt us because when they do sting us, they die. - Okay. - All right, we'll chuck on our hoods now I reckon. - I've been waiting for you to say that the whole time. They do like to get in? - Well faces especially. In nature, bees are almost trained internally in the hive, to target the faces of predators. - [Andy] So the process? - So we smoke them in the front door, which pushes the bees up into the hive. - [Andy] Okay. How much bigger is the queen, than these little guys or girls? - [Jack] She's about the size of half your pinky finger. - [Andy] Really? - To a quarter of your pinky finger. - [Andy] Wow. - [Jack] To get your fingers underneath. - [Andy] Got ya. - [Jack] And bring it over. And you can, oh there's a sting. - [Andy] Oh, poor old Jack just got stung. And now he's like, he couldn't be further away from it. - [Jack] Nice and gently. - [Andy] All the mates came out to say hello. You're joking. Oh, my sunnies are about to fall off my face but I'm not gonna touch 'em. 'Cause I've got heaps of bees in my hands. I'm like, I'm stiffer than that frame. - So loosen up, 'cause bees sense energy as well. - Oh shit. Okay, I'm loose. - So you can see here, you can see the male bees. Which have big fluffy heads. Whereas the females are much smaller and I guess a lot more elegant in the way that they carry themselves. I've given the bees a bit of a smoke to move 'em on. - Oh, far out. Oh they are all over my left hand. - [Jack] You're gonna see a little bee being born. - [Andy] Oh, he's coming out. - [Jack] A bee being born. - [Andy] He comes straight out, will probably sting me and then die. - [Jack] Look at that, a full groom. That's what every beekeeper wants to see. Ah, that's what happens when you put your thumb on a bee. - That's two stings now. - [Andy] There are so many, I can't even fit it in. - [Jack] Nice and slowly, let gravity take effect. - [Andy] Oh my god. Look at them all. - There are a heap there aren't there? So what we're gonna do is, we're gonna take out a box of honey. - [Andy] Yep. - We're gonna extract them. - Yep. So do many restaurants go for the honeycomb around here? - Yeah, definitely. There's nothing quite like the taste of honeycomb. - Oh, it's unbelievable. We always have some on our cheese boards. - Oh exactly. Cheese boards, it's the perfect accompaniment. Put a little bit of an angle on the blade. Facing in. Now using the back end of the blade, you go from top to bottom. Very well done. - Straight in? - [Jack] Straight in. Spin her around. Nice and gentle to begin with. Just until you see that honey coming out. Lift the pace. Keep going. A bit faster. You can start to see the honey coming out. - [Andy] Yep. - [Jack] The honey flying out. - [Andy] Oh smell that. I'm cooked. - Abort. All right, step aside son. - He's got me. - It's actually really, really difficult. - [Andy] It's a good workout. - [Jack] You've got your honey in the bottom of that. - Oh look at the goodness. Look at that. Oh stop it. - [Jack] Once it nears the top, close it. A little bit more yeah you're good. - You wanna talk about Aussie produce. It's gone from that hive, in to this thing, into that jar and it can go straight into your home. And that is some of the best honey that you will find. ♪ Just a little bit more ♪ ♪ Just a little bit more ♪ Mate, one sticky hand to another sticky hand. Thanks for having us. - Thanks for joining me. - That was unbelievable. Like I learned a lot. - Thanks for showcasing. What the bees are doing. - No worries mate, yeah. Can I take this one for the road? - You've done enough work today to justify it. - Ah, I did a little bit. I did a little bit. - You did very well. - I didn't get stung either. - On you trot. See you later. - On you trot? So we're going to Urbane. Which is Brisbane's best restaurant. Queensland's best restaurant. What door do we go in? It's locked. It's open. Hi mate, how are you? Is Alejandro around? - Yes. - Alejandro. How are you mate? Andy. Nice to meet you. So Alejandro, you're gonna take us through a couple of dishes. - Yes. I was gonna show three dishes. - Yep. - One, we call it Roots. - Okay. - And it's four found roots. Which is whatever roots they have available. - [Andy] Carrots are pretty amazing at the moment. - [Alejandro] Yeah, carrot, beetroot, parsnips. - [Andy] Most of your produce, or as much as you can get it, is local? - Yeah. - Yeah. - So we start with cashew puree. It's half cashew, half confit garlic. Water, salt and lemon juice. So here we are, carrots, beetroots. This is kombu oil. We roast the kombu on the grill and then mix it with a vegetable oil. Here is a beer vinegar. We make it here. A bit of thin salt. This is bon siew chelle - Yum. You say it's very simple but there's technique there. - [Alejandro] Yeah. - There's a lot of technique there. - This is wood sorrel, that grows on the back. - [Andy] Okay. - And that's it. - [Andy] Mate that looks stunning. - So this is cobia from North Queensland. We cure it first, with a salt, sugar, kombu. Sauerkraut, we freeze dry this and we make a powder. - Oh, man that's good. So cobia's a black kingfish. The technique is take the filet off. Curing it in salt and sugar and kombu and then slicing it as fine as you possible can. That's so fine. It's nearly translucent. - Yeah coconut water, half lime juice. - [Andy] Okay. - [Alejandro] So we put a little bit on the fish. - I've tried all of the elements on that dish and yet still when I put it in my mouth, it's gonna be totally different than what I can possibly think it's gonna be. Now, you don't just go coconut, lime, sauerkraut, fish. It's just not what you do. - A bit of salt. Very simple. - Yeah again, like four ingredients. A little bit of technique there. - I really like this, it's a shiitake. - I can tell that, yeah. You're smiling with every word that you say. - [Alejandro] Shiitake mushroom ketchup. - [Andy] Ketchup? - [Alejandro] Made in to a powder. - Right. We have a mushroom ketchup on our menu at the moment. On our breakfast menu. - That's good, yeah. - Oh, you could put that on anything. - This is the last one is chicken, parsley curane and green cos lettuce. And with a sauce of preserved lemons and parsley. - [Andy] Oh yum. At first I couldn't wait to try that. Then I can't wait to try that and now that comes out. I'm like, just give me that. Mate, the light on that is ridiculous. Not a bad office. - I left Argentina when I was 18. And then I've been traveling for the last 14 years. - Wow. - I'm 32 now. - Yeah, okay. Why have you sort of fallen in love with Brisbane and Australia? - I think Sunshine Coast was the place I wanted to come. - Do you surf? - To live. - Yeah. - I just saw you plate up three dishes and there seemed to be that underlying similarity in each dish. In that you start with a really good product and then everything around that has just a little bit of technique to make the mind, just trigger a few different senses. - You have to start with a good product. - Yeah. - That's the main thing. And then you just help the ingredient to shine. - [Andy] Yep, let's eat. Where do all your plate ware come from? - [Alejandro] This one? - [Andy] Yeah, it's really beautiful. - Made in Japan. - Okay. - Is called the company. - Just as simple of the ponds of jelly, it makes it. The beets are amazing too. They're really peppery. Righty oh, cobia. So yeah, you're right. You can see that the flesh has sort of firmed up now a bit. With that coconut and lime juice. - And probably do with a little bit less, normally but. - I was expecting the coconut and lime to hit me first - [Alejandro] Yes. - But you get the sauerkraut to start and then it just comes in that back just that nice bit of acidity. That's lovely. The fish is really good. Shall we eat chicken? - [Alejandro] Okay. - So what was the little jus that?-- - That's the chicken jus made with all the bones from the same chicken. Preserved lemons. - Oh okay. - Capers and parsley - Oh, this is gonna be amazing. I'm gonna get in. - You cook it for just 50 minutes at 63 degrees. Yeah that's it. Then we pan fried it last minute. - Yeah. What food do you like to eat? - At home I'm vegan. - Yeah. - I don't eat any meat or dairy. - Why's that? - The more I look into how animals are treated and how, factory farms and the whole thing. - Yeah. - It makes sense to me to avoid animal products. I still taste everything but I think the future will go more into plant based food. - Yeah right. 'Cause I noticed, is it vegan? You do a vegan... - A vegan menu. - Degustation and then a-- - An omnivore yeah. Yeah, there is a market there definitely and I think it does make sense. - Yeah, you gotta try this one. - [Camerman] Yeah, I'm in. I'm always in. - Come on, grab a knife and fork. - [Cameraman] You have fed me. - Another little arm to the restaurant. Another little tick in that environmental box. Is that you've got a closed loop system on sight. I reckon we take a look at that because I've actually been looking at one for our restaurant. - Yeah, here it's there. Something that is really good, this is the bin area. - Yeah, yeah it doesn't smell. - At all. - How much do you put in to get, how much do you get out? Does that make sense? - Okay, you put let's say 10 kilos of waste, you get one kilo out. - Really? - You just open it and throw stuff in. - In how long? - 24 hours. - 24 hours? - [Alejandro] It's amazing, it looks like it's soil. - [Andy] Man, that's so good. - I think every restaurant should have machinery. - Yeah. - That it should be law. - I reckon this is it. We're not gonna see any more water. We're goin' full west, I'm gettin' in. It's heaps shallower than you think hey. All right, let's go to this finger lime farm. Here they are. Yep, pulled over for us. - [Man] What she's driving straight... - I don't know if that's her hey. - [Man] It's a postie. - It's a postie. Hello. - Hi. - Do you know where Ian and Margie live? They've got a finger lime farm around here. - No, I think if you go straight up there, you'll see a couple of mailboxes and turn left. - Right, okay. - Try that. - Magic, thank you. - Not a problem, bye. - Left Hello guys. - Nice to see you. - You too. - You made it okay. - Yeah we made it. We went for a little dip just then. So what's the plan? Shall we head back up that way? - Yep, follow us. - Follow us boys. This is 20 minutes up a mountain. Tree line. On the cliff. I'm flat to the floor. Look at how high we are. It's gonna start raining soon. Look at that to your left, it's full Jurassic Park. Look at it. Well, thank you guys for having us here. This is honestly one of the best locations, we've filmed at yet. - Welcome. - You guys were city slickers in Melbourne. - Absolutely. - What brought you up here? - Well we bought this property just over 30 years ago. - Yeah. - It was a holiday place and we mucked around with avocados for many years. When I was approaching retirement, we thought we should try and do something serious with it and we found finger limes. We were one of the pioneers in the finger lime industry. And we've been doing it for 10 years now. - Did you see like a product and go these are amazing. These are gonna take off. Because no one goes and starts farming the most thorny, pain in the arse bush. There has to be some sort of vision I reckon. - Yeah, well I saw finger limes actually in a magazine and a restaurant, Bennelong, they were using them. And a chef from Chicago was visiting and I said to him, we've got a tree here. - 'Cause they grow wild just in the rainforest, don't they, yeah. - Just over the fence, yeah. So in New South Wales. - Yeah, great, great state. - But then we sort of took it one step further and we now have about 4,000 trees in. - [Andy] Wow. 15 years ago, they weren't much of a thing were they? - Nah. - For a native Australian ingredient. - That's right. No and the ones that chefs were receiving about five, six, seven years ago. It probably took a couple of weeks for them to get the finger limes. And by that time they were nearly through their shelf life. - How's the guineas just coming up to say hello? - [Margie] They've come to visit. They've come to say hello. - On cue. - G'day. - On cue. So I'd massively like to cook those but I can't because they actually have a job here don't they? - They do I know they taste good. Every chef we have here wants to get one. - Yeah. - The emerald trees at the moment, which we've got about 1,500 of, have probably got about 3,000 kilos of small finger limes on them at the moment. - That is so beautiful. Want that Jack Jack? I've had my lips around it. - [Jack Jack] Thanks mate. - What have you got here for me Margie? - I've got-- - This is a champagne pink here. But you squeeze that out. Now when it partially thawed. - Ha ha. - [Margie] Don't eat the skin. - Sorry. - Yes mum. - So that shows you can actually have frozen finger limes that are pretty damn good. - [Andy] Yeah. - [Ian] They're great on sashimi. - Well that's what I'm thinking of doin' we're going out to Fraser Island in the next couple of days. So just make a really simple dressing with the finger limes and a couple of other bits and pieces, that I can get on the way. - [Ian] Let's go for a drive. - Lasa. Bye. - [Woman] Have fun. - What is it? What type of car are we running? - [Ian] It's a Ford Jeep, 1943. - [Andy] 1943? - [Ian] Yeah. - [Andy] Wahoo and that's New South Wales. - [Ian] That's New South Wales. - [Andy] And we're in Queensland? - [Ian] Yep. Where are we goin'? - [Andy] Oh we're goin' into New South Wales. - [Ian] Going into the tunnel. - [Andy] Oh, have a go at this. It's one thing that I have been astounded by Australia, is our climate. And our environments in the space of, this has been 20 minutes. But Tasmania, we went north, south, east, west and you get totally different environments. - [Ian] It's incredible isn't it , yeah. Incredible. - [Andy] Look at all that. - [Ian] Yeah, it does get cold. - [Andy] This is fake. Honestly this looks fake. It's so quiet. Mate, you wait till you do that. - Yeah. - After all that chat with Ian and Margie, I thought I'd get amongst it and check out one of these devils, that produces some fruit. So, take a look at this one here. And you can see why they're such pains to pick. That's all over the bush. Those thorns like that. That makes roses look like your best mates. I don't know if anything can top this. For a native ingredient to be grown in the sub-tropics of Queensland. Bordering New South Wales. It was bone dry down there. It's rainforest up here. And it's producing a beautiful native product, the finger lime. It's ridiculous. We're at Falls Farms. So good friends of mine. Actually newly married, Benny Johnson and Jess Johnson now. They have a farm here with their parents and they're growing a heap of epic stuff. That stuff that we saw at Urbane the other day. This is them. They've got a wood fire here, so if I can find that, I've got a few little bits and pieces to throw in the oven there. I'm gonna get that box. Have you seen anyone Jack Jack, inside? Hello. - Hello. - Hello, how are you? - Andy? - Yeah, that's me. - Christine. - Christine, how are you? Nice to meet you. - Good, welcome to the farm. - Hi mate, how are you? - Bro, I'm Brodie. - Nice to meet you Brodie. Is there any chance we can get straight into cooking? - Yeah, 'cause you're gonna lose the light. - Yes. - And you've gotta collect veggies. - Perfect. - So what would you like me to harvest? - [Andy] Ah, if you've got any beetroots. - [Christine] Yep. - Ah, some tarragon. - [Christine] Yes. - Some parsley. - [Christine] Yep. We've got really nice Dutch cream potatoes. - Oh yeah, bring some spuds up. - I can just get you a basket of stuff. - Perfect, yeah. - And then you can just decide what you're gonna use. Well we'll meet at the wood fired oven or somewhere. All right. - [Andy] Yeah, sounds good. Ha ha, get out. It just keeps getting better and better and better. - Hey mate, that's the Russian garlic. - Right. - It hasn't gone to bulb yet. All of that, is just like a garlic. - Right oh. - [Man] Spices like a leek, just like a garlic. - You can probably tell, I'm in my absolute element. This is exactly how I like to cook. So today, instead of like showing you one recipe of how to cook that meat, how to do that salad or how to do those apples. I'm gonna show you all three. And you're just gonna follow me on this little journey as we put a lot of stuff inside there and see how it comes out. So I've got some pork neck here. So it's quite a fatty piece of pork. It's got a lot of sinew through there and we're gonna cook it nice and quick in there. To about 70 degrees and the glaze it up, so it's nice and sticky at the end. And so a good wack of salt. Some pepper and then just a touch of olive oil. Just to create a bit of contact with some heat. Wack him on. And that's going straight in our wood oven. Let this thing do all the talking. Pork glaze. Remember our honey that we got from Bee One Third, that's gonna be the base of our glaze. Throw a good couple of tablespoons into our bowl. Sticky wicky. Dijon mustard. We'll go in with a tablespoon of that. Fish sauce. Now this is just gonna create a nice little salty kick and cut through all that richness of the honey and the Dijon. So I reckon about half a tablespoon. And then ginger. I've lost my microphone haven't I? - [Cameraman] Life on the road. - Life on the road. Instead of just microplaning it, I'm now gonna have to chop it really, really fine. Okay so ginger's in there, our honey's in there, our mustard's in there. Good wack of salt. And I'm just gonna give it a quick taste. It's quite sweet, just gonna add a touch of lemon juice. And for me, that's deliciousness I've been blessed to get some Dutch cream potatoes straight out of that ground. I'm just gonna treat them really, really simply. But make sure they're absolutely tasty. This stuff, ahhh, duck fat. How good's that gonna be. Potatoes, salt, pepper, duck fat, rosemary, garlic. See ya later. Like cooking for me, this is it. This is absolutely it. Salt, good amount. Rosemary, just get it straight off that stem. And get our garlic and we're just gonna split it down the middle. Maybe go one more and they can go in. Pepper. And then ha ha ha. Go hard or go home. Pork, that's in the oven. And we've got our duck fat potatoes. They're in the oven. Just gonna have a quick look at our porky. She's been in there for about 10 minutes. Ha ha, just spic. So I'll turn him now. 'Cause we want that caramelization all around the piece of pork. See how that's sort of been steaming under there? We want that caramelized, 'cause that creates flavor. And I've got it now at the hottest part of the oven. Once it gets that caramelization going on both sides, I'll just move it to the front here. Move our timber round and just let it cook nice and gently. Now the next one I'm gonna use these beets. I'm gonna roast them pretty simply, as well as some courgettes. In the oven and then we're gonna go preserved lemon, some capers, some lemon, some olive oil, salt and pepper. And a bunch of herbs from the garden. Pretty simply with these guys, salt, pepper, olive oil and let that thing do all the talking. So this is a bulls blood? - [Chrsitine] Deep red. - You use the bulls blood leaves yeah? - Yeah. - Yeah I've used them a lot but I don't think I've used the-- - Yeah they're deep rich. And then the other one you have is called Chioggia and if you cut it across the-- - That way? - Yeah, that way. Then it has the concentric rings. - Get these into some manageable pieces. Cut the cooking time down. So our beets can go in the oven. They'll probably take about half an hour. The one thing about cooking over coals and cooking in a wood oven, is that the temperature changes very often. And arrange our food in there according to that. Apples can go in next. So we've just got your regular Granny Smith. We're gonna chop it in half. We're just gonna slice a little bit of a base so it doesn't roll around and then repeat. And then we're just gonna grab some thyme. Just be quite rough and ready. And just give each apple a good knob of butter. The apples are gonna just puff up like little souffles. If you didn't have a wood fired oven, you could put your oven on 220 and get all this done. And then we're just gonna grab some of that Bee One Third honey and go to drizzle town. Lookin' pretty solid right now. So we're gonna pull that out to the front. 'Cause he can basically just tick away now. We really wanna get some color on those guys. The apples. Se ya. So our little roasted beet salad is still coming together. The more I sort of look at a few things, the more I want to add to it. Christine, what kind of onions are these? - [Christine] Red creole. - We're gonna treat these pretty simply, like a leek or a spring onion. We're just gonna do that to it. It wasn't hard. Everyone can do that. Okay I reckon we can probably lay these over the top of our beets. So we'll bring those guys out and then just scatter them. Oh it just looks good doesn't it? Jack Jack it just looks good. Nah, cool. We're gonna grab our pork out. That's probably 85% there. So now its time to get that glaze all over it. All that dripping, just keep basting it with that. 'Cause that's all flavor. Right oh, back in she goes. Let's take a look at our veggies. So I've just covered these beets, just to create a little oven inside an oven. They're there, so these can be set aside. Our zucchini's they're done but I just wanna get these capers in there. Just to take away that raw flavor, I'm just gonna basically fry these capers. That fire looks good. Pass me the firelighters. Then just move them round with that. Okay, everything's coming together. Potatoes, they pretty much speak for themselves. They've been in duck fat, with that garlic, rosemary and a pinch of salt. There's our apples. So they're nice an charred and caramelized from that honey. The thyme's there, the butter's there. They're collapsed, they're soft, they're done. Our roast veggie salad. So we've got our different types of beets. We've got our onions, we've got our zucchinis. I've thrown in some brazil nuts and we've got our fried capers. I've got parsley and I've got basil. And then I've got a dressing which is just lemon juice, olive oil, mustard and a little bit of preserved lemon. As usual, salt and pepper. And now we're just gonna give that a little toss. And then we'll just grab a bowl and get him. And then I think we've just got the big boy. Here's our pork neck with our honey and mustard glaze. I'd just take that to the table and carve it at the table. So, what do you reckon? Boys?

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