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It's a freezing morning in The Clare Valley and Andy heads to Terroir Auburn to meet local chef and wild food forager, Dan Moss. Amidst pouring rain, flash flooding and road closures, Dan & Andy head off to meet some local food producers.

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Transcript

- They don't stop, do they? Hello there. I'd just like to welcome everyone to the beautiful Clear Valley, where normally sunshine, rolling hills and red and white wine grapes. Today, it's freezing and there's sideways rain, and we don't even know if we can get to the man that we need to get to 'cause there's 17 road closures around the region. We're going to see Dan Moss. He's a local legend. He's been doing some really cool stuff in the area. If we can get to him, we're gonna have some fun. It's not that way. Any directions? That one there. Dan? Hey, mate. - How ya doing? - Are you Dan? - Yeah. - Oh, hey, mate, Andy. - I'll pretend to be, anyway. - Nice to hear, that's perfect. Really good, really good. - Welcome to the sunny Clare Valley. - Thanks, mate. Turn it on for us. It's not today. And you, obviously, a restaurant owner. Not good for business. - No, it's been, as I said, like, really tough, but what do you do? - Yeah. - That's mother nature at its finest. - Yeah. I guess so. - Yeah. And your restaurant, and you as a person, you're all about foraging and finding local ingredients. - Yeah, look, we push a Locavore philosophy, so we're really big on that, and that's not just like a buzz word the chefs use to sound In the moment, - You're actually doing it. - For us it's all about what's around us and seasonality. - Yeah. - Everything within you know, a hundred miles, which I'd like to bring down. - Yeah. - Further. - It's hard, hey? - It is tough. But, you know, once again, it forces you to actually get in the mindset of what's around you and what's in season. That's all we can use and there's no way we deviate from that. - Yeah, yeah. So the restaurant, how long have you had it for? - Yeah, we actually turned four last Tuesday, which is, you know, it's a nice little milestone to get to. - Yeah, yeah. - It's tough in the fickle game. Lots of, we just gonna keep walking? - Yeah, 'cause we walked past the coffee shop. - Dan, I've been bitching and moaning for the last couple days about this weather, but it's actually a big thing here, isn't it? - It's been really testing for not only small business but big agricultural farming area as well, so. - And that's basically what your restaurant is revolved around. - Yeah, so you think about the actual flow and effect of what's happened over the last couple days. - Yeah, and speaking of flow. - Yeah, it's still going pretty hard. - That street just out the front of your restaurant, that was underwater, yeah? - Yeah, the road's been closed for a good three days now. - Yeah, and this would probably be one of your biggest weekends, yeah? - Yeah. Not exactly thrilled with the timing of mother nature, that's for sure. - Yeah. - Good, isn't it? - Cool. That's good. - Another thing to fix. - I don't even reckon that crack's been there. - And it's Tuesday today. You've a pretty special Tuesday, I mean, any city-slicker chef would totally kill for what you do on Tuesday. - Absolutely. Yeah, and I'm really quite happy to do it on Tuesday. I get excited about Tuesdays. So, basically, morning for mine is all about going around to the different veggie plots or seeing the particular old dudes that grow stuff for us. Also got a acre property that my parents have. It's got a nice big veggie patch on there as well, so it's all about going out to those places and seeing what's in store, see if we've got enough stock to get the restaurant up and going for that particular dish, though. Throw it all out on the bench, have a look what we've got, write it down, go home for a bit of peace and quiet. - And you said that you can't do it in here, right? - No, I've got a thing like I can't write the menu in the kitchen. I think I just get, you know, if I see a particular piece of machinery or a particular, sparks kinda start flying and that might influence me. - I can't go grocery shopping because I just get so overwhelmed by - the sheer amount of things - the amount of choice. - Exactly. For mine, it's about terroir. That's kind of what we push here, it's what's around us now, it's what's valuable now. I think there's far too much choice. - Yeah. That's cool, mate, but today's too wet, like what can we actually do? - Well, as it turns out, there's some guys who started up here doing mushrooms, and I think they'll be slightly away from the elements, the way they cultivate it, so that might be a nice place to go have a look at for sure. - Sweet. - But yeah, there's also a couple of veggie patches we can roll by as well. - Even if they're underwater, if we can just have a look. - Yeah, we can just go for a bit and see what we can come up with, I think. - Sounds good. - People are really interested in their food now, like where it's come from and you know, some of the shows that you've been on have really helped people create food awareness. And it's really nice to see some of the big name chefs sort of pairing back. - For sure. - And just going back to like actual general technique and old-school methods of cookery and so that's what the panthers are really chasing now. - I think so, yeah, yeah. So mate, you've brought us here to quite a small farm, and this is you, yeah, this is why you do it, 'cause this is what you like to do. - Absolutely. Little family farm. Let's go have a look at some micro greens and some mushrooms. - That's it. - How you doing? - Hello, Chris. - How are you, mate? - Hey, good, man. Nice to meet you. - Nice to meet you. - Thanks for having us for a see. - Yeah, no worries. - Tell us what you do. - Little bit of micro greens. Sunflowers. Snow pea. Beetroot, which is bull's blood beetroot. And this is a red sango radish. - What do you use? - I'll take a bit of alternate throughout the weeks. Different varieties. But, yeah, beetroot, for mine, like I really find the flavor profile is stunning in that, and also the red sango, like that's really a good peppery radish and I sometimes go a bit over the top like rockets, sometimes a bit too peppery. - Should we have a taste? - Yeah. - Don't eat the seed. It's bloody bitter. - Yummy. That's super fresh. - It's really fresh. - Yeah. - They last such a long time in a bag. I've got customers at the farmer's market who come back the second week, say I just ran out yesterday, two weeks in the fridge. - That'd be unbelievable in a salad. And you also do mushrooms here? - Yeah, yeah. - Lots of mushrooms. - Can we have a look? - Yeah, for sure. - Should've got the gum boots. - There you go. - Mushrooms. I did not expect that. Right. How funky. Just smelly, isn't it? So run us through, because obviously this looks a little weird. Run us through what's going on here. - Inside the bags is just barely straw. - Okay. - And then we inoculate that straw with spawn. The white, or the beanie, white oyster. - [Dan] And how long are we talking for these guys? - When we put the spawn in the straw and stuff it in the bag, it's about four weeks. - Yeah, okay. - So that's not that long. - At the moment, it's four weeks, 'cause it's pretty cold. - Yeah. - [Chris] We expect it'll turn down to two weeks - Okay. - When it starts warming up. - Really? I thought it would be so much, for some reason I thought it's a long and crazy process. - It's 60 days in total from when Ella gets a Petri dish and makes the tissue culture to the farmer's market. - I thought it would be so much longer. - These guys are reaLly vigorous. Most mushrooms are amazingly vigorous. - Give it a twist. - Is that it? - That's it. Harvesting mushrooms. For everyone at home, tell us what we'd look for, 'cause they look stunning. - See how the petals are slightly curved down at the end? - Uh-huh. - That's a fresh mushroom. Once that edge starts curling up and twists back, it just won't last as long. - Because you see them like that all the time. Can really tell from this. - Yeah, yeah. - Aw, shit. Go get Were we rolling yet? - That's gonna be it, I think. - Can I have a little taste? - Yeah, go ahead. - After just being sprayed with, it's just water, yeah? - Yeah, yeah, yeah. - You will not get fresher than that. - No. - Once again, you talk about flavor profile. - You haven't even cooked that. - It's alive. - Yeah. - Juicy mushroom flavor. - That is unbelievable. - That's one of the beauties of being regional, we get this stuff all the time. - And this is at your doorstep. - Makes my life easy to cook as well. Don't even need to cook it. - No, that's what I was just saying. That's the most flavorsome mushroom. I mean, no one ever thinks of mushrooms as raw, but that is, you don't need to do anything to that. It's amazing. - You must be so stoked. - It's pretty incredible to be able to produce 'em, yeah. - Why are they so good, like why have you got it down pat, do you think? - Ooh, I wouldn't say I've got it down pat. - Well, it's a pretty bloody good run. - Well, yeah, I can produce them, yeah. I think, we use rain water, we use standard straw, we don't use any chemicals, nothing, it's just basic ingredients. We make our own culture. - So good. You are so lucky. - Yeah. And also it's important for us to work side by side, you know, like us little guys, and we stick together, and then you get a result like that. Delicious. - So good to sort of, you know, the regional restaurant scene is massive, like massive right now. - I think that's also the way forward. - Yes. - And only like it's really nice to see people go back to the regional areas and like pair techniques back a bit as well, you don't have so many hot jellies and - Yeah, for sure. like actually just using whole foods. - Yeah. - Follow you guys. - Sounds good. ♪ Nowhere to go ♪ It's so tempting to do that, isn't it? ♪ You know me well ♪ ♪ And that is how it is ♪ ♪ It is ♪ It's beautiful, isn't it? Pangkarra Foods is that paddock's quite production. We value sustainable farming methods and natural, healthy premium foods. - It's a bit of a thing out here. It's trendy everywhere else, but here it actually happens, which is really cool. - The main point of difference with our pastures is it's all whole grain, so 100% whole wheat. We don't want to be selling anything that we wouldn't eat ourselves. ♪ Don't know how the days will be ♪ ♪ You don't ♪ - Did you just start planting chickpeas, or did you have them the whole times? - We only started chickpeas again last year. They always got exported to the subcontinent and they've been eating them there 5,000 years. Chickpeas going on so it's - timely. ♪ Ooh ooh ooh ♪ - When are we going bush recovering? - Friday. - Friday. What pasta would you - Yeah, linguini. But I've got some stuff for you guys to take with you. - Wow. - Yeah. Sort of share that around and tell your friends. Driving snacks, convenient! - How do we get these things started? - No, you ride this one. - Seriously, this one will kill you. - This one will kill me. - It's got no brake. - [Man] Jump on, man. - I haven't ridden a Motorbike in my life. This will be good. - Stand the K on. - Right. - And that's like electric stuff, so just push that button and hopefully - Clutch in? - Aw, it doesn't matter for this. Right. So now, if you flick that up, you'll see that light'll go out. - Yeah. - You're in first. So it's just a matter of easing that clutch off and you're away. - You'll be . - I'm on. Let's do this. - [Man} You're a pro. - Let's go. - So here at Wunderbar Lamb Farm, this stuff is probably as good as it gets, Australia-wise. - Okay, tell us why your lamb's really really tasty? What do you do to them to make 'em better than anyone else's? - Well, about three years ago, we seeked out some human choice certification just as a way to help tell our story, - Yeah. - Tell the consumer how our sheep are raised, where they come from. Their big thing is, they've got a big focus on free range and the ethical and humane treatment of your livestock. - You don't get much more free range than the guys that we just saw. How big was that paddock? - That's only a small paddock. - That's a small paddock? - Yeah, that's one of my little finishing paddocks that I keep nice and close to the yard so they're quick and easy to run in and weigh off. Also, a point of difference would be the breed of sheep. We've gone into a shedding clean skin type of breed which drop their wool, which takes away the need for shearing and crutching and probably, most importantly, taking their tails off. - And that's just basically how you get a happier lamb, so therefore - Well, we like to think so. - Yeah, 'cause at the end of the day, that really does create a tastier piece of meat. If they've got a happy life, if you guys are doing all the right things leading up to when they do actually go down the abattoir. It definitely helps guys like myself who are playing in the kitchen. Makes their Life a lot more easy. And we've had a look around, mate. You live on some stunning land. Do you reckon that's got anything to do with it? 'Cause if I was a lamb out here, I would be tickled pink. - Yeah, no, we try and give 'em the best pastures we've got, so this time of year, it's pretty easy. With the rain we're having, there's green grass everywhere as you can see. - Your ideal weight, if you're gonna send them off to the butcher, what are you looking at? - Anything over 40 kilos. A 40-kilo lamb, you're looking at a 20-kilo or more carcass. - I reckon 20, 21, 22, 23, that's where we tend to like 'em. You've got a weird grin on your face. You're gonna get me to do something weird. I can tell. - Can be interesting at times, but we'll see how we get. - Bloody perfect. So basically what we're doing here is weighing the sheep, so once they've been out in there for, how long would they be out in the field for? - Their whole life. - Which is? - Six months. - Six months out there, they then come into here and they're basically ready to go off to the abattoir. They need to get weighed. So looking around 50 kilos for these ones? - Yeah, if one's over 50, just rattle their head or something. - Rattle their head? What does that mean? Aw, give 'em a spray. Holy shit, here they come. So that should automatically shut. 50. Now. How do you open the gate up? - Hang on. - Oh, the handle. There you go, buddy. Go on. There we go. He's getting to run out. Go, buddy. All done? - Cool. Weighing sheep. Tick that off the bucket list. - [Man] Okay. - So when we came down here, we wanted to sort of get some local knowledge. We met up with Dan Moss yesterday and he said you gotta go out and see Ben and his lambs. He's so much about his local guys, supporting the local growers and farmers. That's a big thing around here, isn't it? - To find a chef like that in the Clare Valley that can just buy a whole land and change his menu to use the whole land, that's great for a small producer like me that can just ship him off a couple lambs every now and again whenever he needs 'em, so, yeah, he's really good. - And distribution-wise, you've got a guy in, how do you say it? - Burra. - Burra. Got a guy in Burra. That's probably your main guy that you distribute to. - Yeah, yep, Casey Cooper up there at Cooper's Butchers, he's looked after me pretty well. He's been with me since the start. - And he's got some there now? - Yeah, yeah. - Well, I want to get a couple of racks of ribs, so we'll try and head down there, see if he's got some ribs. - Cool. I'm sure Casey will hook us up. - Hey, fellas. How are you? Is Casey around? - Andy. - Yeah, mate, how are you? Nice to meet you. Mate, how's things? How's the Burra Butcher going? - Yeah? You guys have worked with each other for a while? - What's his land like? - Someone told me you might have a few lamb ribs put aside for me? - Perfect. - Yeah, just a rack, and then I'll break 'em down from there. How much fat have they got on them? I'm just gonna come around here. - Cap off. - Yeah, can you take the cap off, 'cause I'm only gonna roast 'em, so. How are you? - Good. - What are you gonna go for? - Well, I'll tell you actually what I wanted in just a moment. So you get the visuals. Well these visuals are good. - Let's pull out some of those ribs. - Perfect. Can't say much more than that. - Good. Wait, son, listen. I thought I would say that. - Now that's it? Pleasure. Thank you so much. - [Ben] He's a good lad, Casey. - Yeah, he's a legend. He really does, he does have an awesome reputation. - Yeah, yeah. So, it's time for a real fun approach to these. Even be rolling now. - We are. These are the times that I feel like a lucky, lucky dude. Look where we are. I get to cook with this. This product is about as good as we get. We've just seen where it comes from. Today we're doing lamb ribs with sweet soy, orange, and star anise. Comin' in tart. - [Man] See the size of the lambs I've got? Who brought this guy? I've got a thumb-sized piece of ginger here. Roughly julienned. We've got a couple of cloves of garlic. It doesn't need to be fine, 'cause all it's gonna do is act like a marinade and get some flavor into this lamb. And we've got a couple of chilies. Just some long Thai chilies. And we're not gonna blow our heads off. We're just looking for a nice, subtle chili flavor. So that's all gonna go into our marinading bowl. Now we've got the stems and the roots of some coriander here, so all I've gone is whacked the top off those guys, and just with the roots facing up, I've dabbed them into some water here, and you can see how much sand has come out from those roots. They can go in. 'Cause hiding under there is our little star anise. So these have an antiseed-like flavor. They're like a little flower that has little seeds in each little petal, so we want to break them up to disperse that flavor throughout the dish. So we'll go in with three or four of those. Give that another quick stir-around. And you could make this ahead of time. Like you could make this a day earlier. The flavors are only going to develop. I've got some oranges here. So we're just going to zest our orange. A couple of classic flavors here. Lamb, orange, sweet soy and star anise. The zest can go in. Loving that. So we'll slice him in half and then squeeze all the juice out of our orange. So right there, you can see that's gonna add a bit of flavor, yeah, so we've got ginger, garlic, chili, corisands, orange zest, and orange juice. So now we're in with the big boys. Sweet soy or ketchup menace. It's really sweet and molasses-like. We're going in with half a cup. And this is really the base of our marinade. For some saltiness, we've got fish sauce. So, I reckon about a tablespoon, 'cause we really want to season this up nicely. Okay, now last, but not least, a little crack of black pepper. I'm gonna go pretty hard with the black pepper here. Give everything a good mix. This is gonna have a really taste just for seasoning. - [Cameraman] Happy? - Now we're gonna talk about the special stuff, our lamb. So I'm using the ribs here, which is attached to the belly, so it's obviously got a lot of fat and sinew that we need to cook well and slow. So I've asked the butcher, Casey, to take that cap of fat off, because if you don't, you're gonna get a lot of fat that obviously renders out. - [Camerman] Man, that's a good-looking set of ribs. - Thanks, mate. So what we're gonna do with our knife is we're gonna follow that rib down until we get to the base, and then it can go straight through, and that's our rib. So we're gonna marinade these guys, and then lay 'em out on a tray and roast 'em real slow, so into our bowl. So we've got our ribs now, got 'em portioned down. Now it's as simple as grabbing our juicy goodness and getting it right over the top of our ribs. Get straight in there with your hands. You just want to mix everything together so each rib is covered with that sweet soy goodness. - [Camerman] How's that feel? - Oh, it feels so good. From there, we'd normally leave these guys for about at least two hours. I mean, overnight would be amazing. And that's gonna break down all this sinew and turn it into that nice, juicy meat that everybody loves. - [Camerman] It's back to a wide shot, Jakey. - Lamb ribs are looking and smelling ridiculous. These guys go into a pre-heated oven at 150 degrees for two and a half to three hours until that meat is falling off the bone. There has to be something for me to do to pass that time. This is gonna get so weird. Hey, I've got your milk. Want some milk? Look at the camera, buddy. Geez! It's easy. Not. Here you go. Have your own bottle. They're not like little placid things, are they? I can't do three. - [Man] No, they're hungry. - Oh, I like that. - Yep, that's it. - Oh, now I've got it. Now they're frothing. Just a normal day at the office. They don't stop, do they? This poor guy. You need some. That's it. Fully done. No more milk. I'd be so sick if I'd have just did that. If I was them. That's like 350 mils of milk. I'm telling you right now, they have turned out absolutely delicious. All that fat has just melted away, and that is just juicy, juicy lamb. Last thing we're gonna do is give a good squeeze of charred orange. You don't have to do anything else. Put them straight in front of your best friends, or actually, someone that doesn't like you, because I guarantee, after they ate that, they're going to. Lamb ribs, sweet soy, orange, and star anise. - Well, if Harry can eat it, that's a pass, Andy. So what? That's a wrap.