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Andy heads down into the Yorke Peninsula where he makes a Blue Swimmer Crab pasta to die for. Following this, he connects with local Indigenous figure and touring leader, Quenten Agius, to forage for the quandong, a native Australian fruit.

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Daily food & travel inspiration in your inbox

Transcript

- Hey mate, how are ya? What are we gonna do here? What's that? Just having a dab while he's making the bread? It's Friday, it's heaving. - The cafe's full of people. - Well, we've made it to the York Peninsula. The town's an absolute buzz. Tell you what, we're gonna be the talk of the town. Everyone's come to say hello. Hey mate! - Let's try another one. - So here we are, we made it to the York Peninsula and the town's abuzz. The serenity, is at an all-time high. And now just gotta find something to do. - [Cameraman] That just locked both cars. - [Josh] We've had this chat so many times. - Hello, how are you? - Good, how are you? - Very, very well. - Welcome. - Thank you very much. I'm Andy. - Good to see you. - Lovely to have you. - Thanks so much. - I'm Jerri. - What's the plans, Jerri? - Well, if we don't run out of water-- - Yeah? - We'd better get moving pretty swiftly. - Is the tide going out? - Tide's going out. - Yeah? - We need to wriggle along and - Let's do it. - Get you geared up. - Geared up? What does that mean? - Dress you up in waders and - Perfect. - Socks and boots. - I'm ready, dress me. - Hello, mate. How are you? Steve, I'm Andy. - Andy. - Very nice to meet you. - You too. - Bloody hell. - [Jerri] Andy, there's a pair of socks. - Bloody hell. - Just break the socks on and you'd be sweet. - That's heaps better. - Aye, it is. - It's also warm. - No one'll miss me in that thing. - Getting that on camera, boys? He's pretty ripped. - I'm coughing shit already. - You can have the beanie. - Killing it. - [Steve] Can handle that. - Thank you. I'm ready. This is going to be interesting. The York Peninsula's just turned into the best town that we've been to. Hooked up with a couple of characters, we're going to the oyster leases, it's time to eat the jewels of the sea. - [Cameraman] How good's his getup, by the way? - In terms of safety, I'm sort of like the boss of the wash so you gotta do what I say. Okay, we're set to go. Jump on board and away we go. Oi, Dan. You going faster than this? - Man, this think would hook. It's a 150 on the back. - Where ya going, Dan? - What temperature's the water? - 15 degrees, it's not too bad. - "It's not too bad?" - [Dan] You wanna have a look at one of these bags, Steve? - Yeah, why not. - [Andy] How does that? - These are our juveniles. - Just pop straight in, eh? - Yeah, just jump in. There ya go. - How old are these guys? - These are probably six months old. There ya go. You can see distinctive rings - Yeah. So this is their first season. - How long 'til they get to an eating size? - Probably two and half, three years. - Yeah, right. In this water, yeah. Right. That is a razorfish. - That's a razorfish. - And that's an abalone on there. - Well done, and you can eat those things? - You can. We used to eat these as kids. Mum would bash 'em out flat. See, it's that heart that you're looking for. Why don't we cut him up. - It really is like a scallop, isn't it? - Very much so. There ya go, have a piece. - Razorfish. - [Jerri] What do you think of the flavor? - It's tasty. Way more flavor than a scallop. Better try and catch one. Oh, think I got one. - Oh yeah, yeah. - Oh, come on. - There you go. - Got him! - The man, you're the man, Andy! Slip the knife along the edge. - Oh, okay. Not listening to me. - Sorry. It'll pop open, that's it. - I got ya. - Yeah. See, there ya go. That's razorfish, boys. - Sweet! Razorfish. - More? - [Camerman] Yeah. It's on tap. - Right-o, Dan. Jump on, Andy. - Next spot. - [Steve] He's only a youngster, that one. These New Zealand fur seals, they're not Australian sea lions. - [Andy] I want to eat an oyster in the water. - These are native oysters. Let's get a couple of these out. - Are they in the channel cause, as you said, it's a bit deeper - Yeah. And water moves a bit quicker? - That's right. More food here for bigger oysters. That's what we want. Yep, thanks. Jerri insists that we use our new bloody shucker. Here it is. That's the native oyster. Now they grow a bit bigger than that but they certainly aren't massive like a Pacific. - It's going straight down - Eat 'em up my gullet. - Generally regarded as a bit gamier, bit stronger flavor than the Pacific. - You are right, they're totally different straight out of the ocean, aren't they? - Yeah. - Joshy, you're on, mate. - That's nice. - That is nice. Better give that to the producer. Here, Joshy. - Give me that, Steve. - How's that? - [Josh] That's from the ocean all right. - Dan, these are sensational. I'm wasting all my good ones on these snoozers. - Mate, you better hold back otherwise I'll start thinking that you're a bit better looking than you actually are. - [Steve] There ya go. Rip into them, boys. - How good's that? First stop at the York Peninsula, we've just been out to the leases with a couple of absolute legends. Now, next stop, we're gonna get some blue swimmer crabs and I've got a little fun bag for later. Let's go, I reckon. - Basically all you do is-- just like that, and away ya go. - Well, now let's see how we go. - [Cameraman] Is it gonna be long enough? - Yeah. - [Cameraman] Yeah? That's all right? - This might look a little weird, but believe it or not we're going crabbing. Apparently you go out here and just rake 'em up. Shall we do it? - Okay. - Yeah, I'm on. - Only up to your knees even. - Knee deep. - Rightio, is there anything we're looking for or are you just looking for crabs? - So you pretty much, like these dark spots-- - Yeah. - Just give them a bit of a once over. - Give them a rake. - Cause what they do is they bury themselves into the sand. - Yup. - They only sort of go just under the surface a bit. - It's as simple as that. - Let's see it. - Just give it a rake. See if it's happy days. If you do find one you you'll feel a fair bit of a weight on the end of it so you'll know. - So I'll know. - I don't know whether we're going to have much luck. - Raking crabs in the York Peninsula. We're not really raking crabs at the moment are we? We're just raking sand. I feel like we're getting into a good spot. No. Oh, you got one! - It's a little rock crab. - Ah mate that'll do! - But there's one for you. - Yes! He's only a tiny but he's a crab. - He's only a little one. - We should put them back. They're only tiny. I'll just put him down over here. That one's dead. Oh no, he's kicking. So Reese, this whole crab raking thing it's a bit of a local tradition yeah? - Yeah, a lot of them do do it around here. My mum she's grown up doing it. That is, she just does it for fun. She's a bit of a whisperer at it. - Oh really? - Yeah. - We should have brought her along. - She's a bit of a fiend on it. She get's plenty of them but-- - The crab whisperer. - Yeah. - Well Reese it wasn't for a lack of trying mate. We basically raked from here to the jetty with no luck. - We gave it a red hot crack for a good hour or so and yeah it just didn't turn out for us did it. - I do actually need some cause I'm going to do a little crab pasta dish. - I reckon I can make a couple of calls see if they've got a few floating around in the fridge that we could possibly use. - Perfect. Man I'm going to be back one day cause I'm not done with raking crabs. I'm going to do it. - Yeah. - [Joshy] How long you cook it for? - I actually have no idea. Cooking instructions, ten minutes approximately. - Getting your pasta tossed? - JK. So after a long day, unsuccessfully, raking crabs in the York Peninsula. No. I've scored a couple of blue swimmers here off the locals and I've decided to cook something that I've never done before. I'm going to try and do a blue swimmer crab pasta with crab guts sauce. - What? - A crab gut sauce needs crab guts so these are our beautiful York Peninsula blue swimmers that have been freshly raked probably from out there somewhere. All we're going to do is clean these guys up which is pulling that head straight off. As soon as I do that, see in here? This is all that gut that we want to keep and we're going to turn that into a really pungent sauce for our pasta. Ah yeah she's nice and gutty. That we're then going to poach in boiling salted water for about six or seven minutes, until the flesh is cooked. I'll just throw a lid on to get it back up to a boil. I should have brought a lid. I really do hope it works though. - [Joshy] There might be a reason why you don't eat crab guts. I bet there is. - Right, as you can here timer's going off. That's six, seven minutes. We're just going to go straight out into ice cold water. It's just going to stop that cooking process so they do go crazy and over cooked. You can see they've got that lovely, sort of orangey, trademark color that shellfish does when it's cooked. Wait till they're cooled down and then we're going to pick the flesh. For the sauce, don't throw this stuff away, I need 150 mL of our crab stock. So lets just get some of that out. We also need some white wine. Now come with me, cause something weird is happening down here. Rumor has it, down in these parts of Australia you can chill a bottle of white in the ocean. Fair way out. All you're meant to do is get a bottle of your finest white and just throw it in the ocean and then just pull it back with a string. She should be chilled. Ah yup, I hope you like seaweed with you're Chardy. It's pretty much worked out. Chilled bottle of wine. Righto, let's get saucy. I've got a pan on medium-high heat, then I'm just going to go in with some olive oil which I don't have. I just need some olive oil. We've got a good lug of olive oil in the pan and now I'm going into the base of our sauce. So, I've got a couple of our shallots, about two or three cloves of garlic, and some tomatoes. I'm just going to cook them down until they start to soften. We don't really want to get too much color on them. We're going in with the gut. So all that goodness can go straight in the pan, and it will start to cook out and release that really intense flavor. Can you boys peel some crabs for me? Yeah, I'll come to you mate don't you even bother moving. Rightio, saves me so much work. So that's starting to really release the aroma from the guts. Now, we're going to add a little bit of acidity just to cut through that harsh flavor. So I've got about 50 mills of white whine and then I'm going to add about 100 mills of our crab stock and from there we're going to bring that down by two thirds so it intensifies that flavor. Now we're going to put in the canister and blitz it up. I don't know how this is going to go, we'll see. Who can be the guinea pig to taste this thing? - Yeah me. It's creamy. - Creamy? - It's creamy. - There's no cream in it. - Mate it tastes creamy. - I'm now going to strain it and we're going to bring it down further. It just needs to be more intense. Remember, this is the first time I've made this thing. I'm kind of winging it, a lot. I think it's going to work though. I'm going to check it, give me something. - Mhh, not bad, not bad. - Yes! How are we going with the crab meat boys? Done and dusted? Ah, legends. Thank you. - Easy done mate. - Righto, we can nearly put this thing together now. Our sauce is where we want it to be. We can get a pan on. Now we can go in with some of our sauce. Then our excellently prepared crab meat and because I'm down here I'm being super generous with that. Our pasta, it can go in. I've got some fresh peas and now I'm just give it a quick toss. That's just going to coat all of our pasta individually. It's actually smelling pretty good. So a good crack of black pepper. We're going to finish it with a squeeze of lemon. Give it one last toss and now we can go into our bowl. And that has turned out not too bad. It's my blue swimmer crab pasta with crab guts sauce here from the absolutely lovely Black Point, Black Point? - [Jerri] Yeah. - Black Point in the York Peninsula. Next time, I'm coming down to rake my own blue swimmer crabs. - That's tasty that's for sure. - I'm getting in there. - Set. - Thank you so much for that. - Thanks mate, ta. - [Andy] So where do you live Quenten? - We live on the aboriginal community of Point Pearce. - Point Pearce? - Yeah. - Yeah, right. How far away from that is here? - 45 k's I suppose on the western side of the peninsula. - Right. - So you can see the quandongs here. They're a lot smaller than I thought they would be. Are these tasty kids? - Eh kind of. - Kind of. - So you can eat it straight as it is right now. - So that's it. - It's a fresh fruit, yeah? - You eat the skin and everything, what's-- - We eat the skin yeah. - Yeah? - You can hear it rock inside, you know what I mean? When, see the nut in there? - There's a seed inside? - Yeah. - Alright. - So you just eat it straight out there. - How do people normally eat them? - We eat them straight away. - Quite citrusy, eh. - Other people, some of them make quandong pies and jams with it. - Jams yeah. - They're a native plant to Australia. - Far out. - I thought I'd show you these here. - Just on the side of the road. Rather than pull up and go shop or supermarket, bloody supermarket here. - You probably want me picking some eh? - [Joshy] Yeah get in there, grab a few quandongs. - I need to get fully in there. There's an epic one at the top here. - Come on get in there. - I'm trying! - Tall bloke like you, think you'd have no problems grabbing that. - Yes! - [Quenten] There it is. You disappeared under the bush. - I got him. - He find his way out or what. Oh he's right, he's here. - [Child] No, he's gone. - Got him. - How'd we get him, you didn't end up scratched or anything? - No, I'm good. One of the big things for me with this show is to uncover what Australia's menu is and I think we're doing it right now. Before multiculturalism, was the aboriginal people and to see that that's still going on now. Driving down the side of the road, pulling up, picking quandongs, we're about to go hear some traditional stories about the aboriginal people, that's Australia's menu. That's where it all started. So the butter fish-- - Yeah. - How do you normally cook them? - Just right straight on the coals. - On the coals, yeah? - And we got the blue bush that we use and we give it a bit of flavor. - Okay. - And the blue bush is the same bush we use to smoke ourselves before we go out spear fishing. - Right, what's that all about? - With the smoke it disguises the smells. - Okay. - We try not to swim with white people because every time we jump in the water with white people the bloody shark tend to rock up. - Really? - Randy, get away Randy. When we look at out here, there's a rock formation going out and it's a wall the old people use, and where the wall is, the fish will follow it and there's a small break in the wall. - Yeah. The old people would put their nets around with the breakers and that's how the old people would catch fish - Yeah okay. - So, the old people talk about creation story here. We talk about withut-too, the white pointer, and the old people say that the young boy went down to the water's edge and he grabbed a little wiggly out of the water and he grabbed a piece of bark from a small tree and wrapped it around the wriggly and let the wriggly go. The next day, it came back and called out means fish fish, let me see you. - Yeah. - And then the fish came back in, and this time it was a bit bigger. So, he went to another tree and grabbed a piece of bark off of that and wrapped it around the fish and let the fish go. And the next day, he came back again so this time the fish was bigger again, so he went to another different tree and grabbed a different bark off of that and wrapped that around the fish and let the fish go. And then he come next day, and did the same thing again. This time the fish raised its head and showed its teeth, and he's saying, look, look, look, teeth, the shark withut-too and that's how he talks about the shark, the white pointer, raise his head out of the water and showed it's teeth. - Yeah, right. - And the more people talk, tell these stories, people call them dreaming stories, but to us they're more about the loral and how guides us. It's like when we go out and we go out fishing, after a couple of beers, and we get home and we start having a beer or two again and spinning a yarn or telling a story and the fish was this big, and then the fish got this big-- - After every beer it got bigger. - Yeah, and the fish was only this big to begin with. So do you want to talk about this old camp oven here? - Where is it? - Right here. What's left of it, you know. So we come here and we notice that the old camp oven was getting destroyed and as you can see now there's not much left of it now. - Yeah. - So we took the ash of it, took it back to the museum, the museum sent it away to get it tested, and it came back dated 7980 something years old. - No way. - So this is a recorded site now and it's the oldest site on the York Peninsula. - Wow. I wish we had more time so you could have showed me how to do some cooking. I'd love to see how you guys do it. In my new restaurant we're cooking a lot over coal. - You'll have to tell us where your restaurant is. We'll have to go and have a thing when we're in Sydney next time. - Yeah. So it's pretty much from birth that they're introduced to this respect of the land and knowing how much land plays in their life to come. - Yup, so you got it bruv. That's what it's all about really. - I think there's a lot more to learn than the last 15 minutes we've spent together. It truly is, it is amazing. It's really really cool to hear and see what you guys are about. - So what we're going to do now is get the offer, Colin, the elder, to come and give you a butterfish. - Hello Colin, so this is the butterfish? - Mate, thank you so much Quenten. - Thank you. - Today was unbelievable. It's really made me think about the aboriginal culture, heritage, and the land. Mate, I'm really excited to see what I can do with this one and I've learned a lot from you so thank you. - Thanks for having the time for us. - Mate, no worries, thank you. Should we get our portrait? - Maybe we can start throw a bit of fish somewhere and be a decoy for these flies. This is our last stop in the York Peninsula. We've pulled off road and onto the side of the beach. We're fully roughing it. The Australian salute is going everywhere and I'm going to cook, again, something that I've never cooked before. We're going to try and do a little quandong jam out of these guys. So the quandong, typically quite a acidic and also quite bitter and sour so we're going to put some brown sugar in there. A few other bits and pieces. We're going to cook that down and put it with the butterfish that Quenten gave us before. So the first thing we want to do is peel our quandong and we ant to remove that outer flesh and get rid of that seed, that's is inedible. This stuff we're going to shop down and throw into out chutney or our jam, yeah this is a first also. Oh yeah, just pull up on the side of the road, get some quandongs, which I've never cooked before, get some butterfish, cook it up, oh my. Now we're just going to run our knife through them. Just a rough chop. Mate, I am getting horsed by these flies. So that's our quandongs prep and now we're going to get onto the things that are going to offset the sourness, bitterness of our quandongs. So, I've got a red onion here. We need about a quarter of it and then we'll give it a fine dice. I've got a garlic clove here just going to peel that, and we'll just finely slice that up. A chile. Again the sweetness of the chile add little bit of heat. Some cherry toms, quarter them. And then some lemongrass. So, we're just going to get the back of our knife and smash it up, and that's just going to release all of those oils. Oh my god. We've got our onion, garlic, chile, cherry toms, lemongrass in one and we've got our quandongs in the other. Yeah! Joshy, I need some sort of oil, some grapeseed oil. Ah legend. Enter grapeseed oil, good lug in there, and then we can basically go in with all of our ingredients, and we just want to sweat all that down and start getting those flavors released. Then we're going to hit it with a little bit of brown sugar and some water and cook it right down until it's really jammy. Mate, we are literally on the side of a cliff. So that starting to actually smell alright. It probably should cause it's got a fair bit of tasty stuff in there. Mate, whoever go him was a good shot. Straight in the face. So we're now going in with our sugar. I got about a cup and a half of brown sugar a good lug of water and now we're going to bring that to a boil and cook that down until those quandongs start to breakdown and it becomes nice and jammy. On to the butterfish. Time to take a few filets off you. Mate, there are so many bones in this thing. I've never seen a fish like this. Their is our butterfish filet. So our jam's starting to do its thing here now. Its come down quite considerably. I reckon that's about 20-25 minutes. I'm just going to boost a couple of limes in there because really all we've put in that base is sugar and water. I'm going to have a quick taste of that. It's actually pretty good. - I'll try it. Yum! - Just get a little bit of fresh coriander and just stir that through there right at the end. Quandong jam, who would have thunk it. Righto, time to cook our fish. I'm going to try and crisp this skin up. It's got a nice layer of pretty high coarse skin on there and I was handed it by Quenten today, super passionate, so let's try and do it justice. Season our fish up with just some salt a good wack of grapseed oil in. Let's go in with our fish. So, skin side down. Then the trick with crispy skin is you just leave it. We've got a hot surface so it's going to stick and then it's going to lift up. Just give it time and you'll know when it starts to get a little bit of golden around these edges. Now you start dealing with the flies eh. The fish has been cooking now for about five minutes on that bottom side on a medium heat. It hasn't been firing the whole time. Have a go at that. We've kind of cooked that about 80 percent of the way on the one side and now we're just going to kiss it on that flesh side, about two minutes. We're going to be quite generous with our quandong chutney Place him in the middle with coriander and then we'll just finish him with a little piece of lime. So how's that? That's crispy skin butterfish and quandong chutney. Two ingredients that I have not even seen before today. I hope that I've don't this justice Queten. We're in the back of a high lux in the middle of South Australia on the York Peninsula. This is pretty good. - [Joshy] How the quandong jam? Quandong jam's not too bad. Anyone want to try it? - Mhh, that's alright.