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Gregory Gourdet's Seafood, Bacon & Kimchi Hotpot

Gregory Gourdet's Seafood, Bacon & Kimchi Hotpot

Dish - Sn 1/Ep 18Dish - Sn 1/Ep 18

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Chef Gregory Gourdet of Portland's Departure crafts a bacon and shrimp hotpot combining locally sourced seasonal ingredients with South Korean flavors to create a complex dish that is spicy, crunchy and most of all, full of umami.

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Transcript

- Our hotpot brings together traditional Korean flavors with local Portland ingredients. It highlights bacon that is grown and made in Oregon with beautiful gochujang that we import from South Korea, so you see this really great combination. My name is Gregory Gourdet, and I am the executive chef of Departure here in Portland, Oregon. While I was studying at the CIA, the Culinary Institute of America, I had an internship at Jean-Georges. Cooking there is where I was first exposed to true Asian flavors. A lot of those Asian flavors had a very strong parallel to my Haitian upbringing. This hotpot is truly a combination of techniques I've learned at Jean-Georges and truly what Departure is today: Asian flavors and seasonal ingredients from here in Portland. Our hotpot starts with a broth made from chicken stock and kombu seaweed. Traditionally, this stew is made with water, but I wanted to add a little bit more richness and a little bit more umami to the dish. We let it simmer gently for 30 minutes to really extract that umami from that kombu and season that stock. We remove the kombu and reserve the stock. We'll use the stock to make the stew in a little bit. We serve the hotpot with short-grain rice to absorb all those delicious flavors in the broth. The first thing we do is wash the rice to get rid of all that extra starch. After that, we'll add some cool water, rub gently until the water runs clear. We add the rice to the pot, add the water. Once it's at a boil, reduce the heat, and cook it about 15 minutes until it's nice and fluffy. This hotpot is all about developing flavor. We cook all the ingredients in the same pot, so you want to make sure to really caramelize and develop all those flavors individually to have them marry really well at the end. The first thing we do is warm up our stone bowl to extremely high heat. Once it's almost smoking, add your grapeseed oil, and get that hot as well. The next step is to add your bacon. We're caramelizing the bacon to get some really great delicious bacon flavor out of it. We'll add mushrooms and caramelize those just a bit until they're just starting to get golden. Next, we'll add onions, garlic, and jalapeno. We're just cooking until we get the edges soft and just a touch caramelized, to really develop the flavors of these individual ingredients. We add daikon for a little vegetal crunch, and then we introduce gochujang. Gochujang is a spicy, funky, fermented bean paste from Korea. It'll add a beautiful depth and richness to the final broth. We'll add gochugaru. Gochugaru is Korean chile. It's a little spicy, a little bit sweet, and it'll actually give the broth some body. We'll add our flavored stock from earlier, which will add depth and umami to our finished product. Once our stock is simmering, we'll add kimchi. The kimchi is going to give it lots of great acid and lots of great crunch. We'll start adding the final layers to our dish, and it's important to work very quickly with these next two ingredients. We'll add our shrimp. Make sure that your soup is at a rolling boil, and finish off with a raw egg. You want to make sure that your shrimp are well-dispersed in the broth, and at the same time, pour hot broth over the egg to make sure that it gets cooked just to medium. Once the shrimp is just cooked through and the egg is just set, we take the hotpot off the stove and plate it. To add final little bits of flavor and umami, we finish with nori that is cut into julienne and toasted nutty sesame seeds. We'll serve it with steamed white rice, and here you have Departure's bacon shrimp kimchi hotpot. This hoptpot is really special to me because it really showcases some of my favorite Korean flavors and one of my favorite countries. There is a foundation of chiles and developing flavors and those both speak to my Haitian heritage and my formative years at Jean-Georges. It really honors and respects traditional Asian ingredients with the bounty that Portland has to offer.

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