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Using her grandfather's 70 year old recipe (as well as a dash of positivity), chef and owner of London's aptly named Brilliant Restaurant, Dipna Anand, cooks up a brilliant Masaledar Haadi & Chapatti.

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Transcript

- The philosophy of The Brilliant is to cook from the heart. That's something that I've been taught by my father. He says when you go into the kitchen and you start cooking, you must go in with a positive mind because all that positivity is reflected into the food. My name is Dipna Anand. I'm chef and owner of Brilliant Restaurant in Southall. Today, we're cooking masaladar chicken with some chapati. It's a recipe that's 70 years old. It's been passed down from my grandfather to my father and now to me. We use exactly the same spices and the ingredients that he used to cook with, and it's great because every time we make it, we know there's a story behind it. My first memory of this dish was when my father was cooking it in our kitchen at home. I was only a child. I must've been about seven or eight years old, and I remember watching over him in the kitchen and just looking really intrigued about what he was putting in, asking him lots of questions, and he would just turn to me and say 'watch and learn.' When customers dine at The Brilliant, they become part of our family. This dish is not only a signature dish here at the restaurant, but also one that we frequently cook at home. I mean, you just can't go wrong with it. Masala chicken with some hot chapatis, amazing, brilliant. All the ingredients used and all of the spices are really important to create the depth of flavor needed for this dish. First of all, you finely chop your onion. Chopping your onion fine will ensure you produce a nice, smooth masala sauce. Then, the pan goes on, and once the oil's heated, you add the cumin seeds. Once your cumin seeds are sizzling, or I like to say when they're talking to you, you know they're ready for your onions. To get a curry perfect, you must caramelize your onion before you go in with the ginger garlic paste, your green chili, and your butter, and what the butter will do is just help the sauce to achieve a nice, smooth texture. You add your plum peeled tomatoes, you cook your tomato for about a minute or so, and then you need to add your red chili powder for the taste and flavor and the hotness, and the turmeric, and turmeric in our cooking is just for color purposes, nothing to do with flavor. In fact, if you add too much turmeric, your dish will become bitter. You then cook your masala sauce for about five to eight minutes. The oil and the butter will start to seep out the edges, the sauce will really start to sizzle, and that's another really crucial step in cooking a masala sauce perfectly. Once your masala sauce is cooked, you go in with your chicken and your water. Chicken on the bone always tastes much better. When you mix your chicken and your sauce, you stir from the edges of the saucepan because you don't wanna start to break your chicken pieces. At that point, you can also lower your heat. So, you cook it a little bit slower, but you cook it right the way through. Once your chicken's been cooking for about five to six minutes, you're gonna go in with the finishing touches. Add your carom seeds and then some fenugreek leaves in the palm of your hand, crushed, some garam masala, which is the king of spices, and coriander always goes in at the end because it's one of the herbs that loses its flavor the quickest. Cook for one to two minutes and you're done. Chapatis are a traditional Punjabi bread made with whole wheat flour, and it's a great accompaniment to any curry. Firstly, you add your chapati flour into a bowl. You then add your vegetable oil followed by some water a little at a time. Start by using your fingertips to mix the dough, add a little bit more water, and then when the dough starts to thicken and form, you need to use the whole of your hand to hold the bowl with one hand and knead with the other, and as it thickens up, you will then start to almost punch the dough until it all comes together. You leave the dough to rest for about 30 minutes, and that's important because when you come to rolling out the chapatis, you want them to have a nice clean finish, and that will only happen if your dough has rested. Before you roll out your chapatis, you must heat your tawa or your griddle. You split the dough evenly into pieces, and then you round each of the pieces using your hand to form a nice smooth dough ball. Dip it into the flour, press down on one side, flip it over, press down on the flour on the other side, and then you can press each of the edges to form a disc of about five centimeters. Grab your rolling pin and start to roll out your chapati. It's important that you don't apply too much pressure to the rolling pin. You want to ensure that the chapati starts to turn by itself, and then flip it from hand to hand to get rid of any excessive flour, and then it's tossed right onto the tawa or the griddle. Flip it over. Once the chapati is half cooked on both sides, you'll see small air bubbles. You then know it's ready to be tossed over the naked flame, and here we have a Brilliant unique style we use for the tossing. We put our chapati onto a spider and then we toss it over the naked flame and flip it over until the chapati is fully cooked on both sides. Take it off the heat, brush it with butter, which will give it an even nicer taste and ensure it doesn't go dry, and then it's ready to serve. When it comes to presenting the dish, we present it in what we call a karahi. A karahi was something, traditionally, we used to cook in back in the day. Spoon the chicken into your karahi, put it onto the burner, garnish with some fresh chopped coriander, serve with chapatis, and you're ready to dig in. This is a dish which is unique. The balance of spices is really important. You get the ginger and garlic come through. You get the zestiness from the fresh coriander. You get a unique flavor from the carom which produces a nice thyme-like taste. It's spicy, it's a dish that you can eat more and more of. Rich in texture, rich in flavor. How you eat this dish is really up to you. We believe anything you eat with your hands automatically tastes better, and if it's on the bone, you can actually take a piece and start tugging. That's the beauty of having gorgeous masaladar chicken like this one. Once a customer has dined with Brilliant and has had a sample of the masala chicken, he or she is sure to be back real soon to experience all of these flavors.