Daily food & travel inspiration in your inbox

Chef Ludo Lefebvre's Onion Tarte is meant to be eaten socially, so bring your friends when you go to Petit Trois in L.A.

Daily food & travel inspiration in your inbox

Daily food & travel inspiration in your inbox

Transcript

- The onion tart is really a celebration of food, bring people together, share a little glass of wine, this is really a dish, would come from the heart. My name is Ludovic Lefebvre. I am the chef/owner of Petit Trois restaurant in Sherman Oaks. The onion tart for me is memory. When I was on vacation in South of France, and for me was really about celebration. That's why I want to bring this dish here at Petit Trois because it's really about sharing and people together. It's an inspiration from the pissaladière in South of France. Pissaladière is an onion tart, you know. We eat the pissaladière most of the time for apéritif. You have a little glass of rosé or pasties, be on the beach or outside on the terrace and you have little bit of pissaladière with apéritif. I love onion tart. I love onions. Who don't like caramelized onions? Tell me, who don't like bread dough pizza? Everybody like that. So put these two together and it's amazing, okay. The onion tart for me is fully memory where you have all your family, all your friends, all together... and we just celebrate our time together. We have a sharing moment, sharing life with people. It's sharing a good time with your friend. Food is about that, not just eating, but sharing time. What I like about the dough is it's very easy to do. I know it's not a long process. It is very easy dough. Sometimes dough can be very complicated, so is a very, very easy process to do this dough. To the water, we are going to add yeast. You are going to mix the yeast with the water with your hand. You want to really make sure the yeast dissolve very well in the water. To the mixing bowl we are going to add flour. We're going to add some salt. We're going to put the bowl in the stand and turn the mixer on. Then, we are going to add our yeast to the flour. The dough is going to mix and start to come together. Add the olive oil and when the dough become together it's going to be nice and shiny. When the dough is totally mixed, we are going to turn off the mixer. We are going to put some flour on the cutting board, take the dough out of the mixing bowl, and we are going to form the dough into the bowl. You take the dough and you shape it like a ball. You are going to put the flour into the bowl. We are going to put the dough and cover it with a wet towel. And we are going to let it set and proof. When it is proofed, the dough is ready. Caramelized onions. Make sure, when you cook your onions, start your pan very, very low and don't burn your butter. You really want to cook your onions, very, very, very slowly. Very gentle, okay? Take your time. When you want to caramelize them right away, to a hot pan add butter, and you really, really want to melt your butter very slowly. Okay? Very slowly. No coloration. When your butter has melted, it's time to add the onion. And make sure to stir very well the onions. Don't be afraid also to use your hand, your finger, and just separate all the onion. You want to really make sure the butter are on all the onions. It's very tricky, but put some love in it. To the onion, add a pinch of salt. You want to saute your onions until they are translucent. Okay? Translucent - nice color - translucent. When the onions are nice and shiny, add the sugar. And then it's time to cook slowly the onions. Don't leave the kitchen, always come to see what's going on in the pan, okay? Stir them every five minutes. I know it's a long process but you're going to love it. You know your onions are done when you see the beautiful brown color and they stick together, and you have almost an onion paste, but it's very important you still feel texture of the onions. They are cooked, but you still feel the onions. The combination of crispy dough, the melted compote onion, is just a magical flavor in your mouth, but the onion tart is also a lot about texture. It's very crispy and very moist. Before we roll out our dough, we put flour on the board. You really want to roll the dough very, very thin. You can give any shape you want. You can do round, you can do oval, do square, be free. What you do is roll while putting it all on the rolling pin and then after transfer to a nonstick sheet tray. To a bowl, add crème fraîche and the fromage blanc. Mix it together, seasoning with white pepper and salt and then mix that all together. You are going to spread that on top of the dough, but very, very thin. Don't put too much. It's not a sauce. We are going to add our onions. Take them, with your hand, and really put a little bit every where on the tart. You really want to have the onions even. Each bite need to be perfect. Sprinkle after with a little fresh thyme. Then place in the oven. You know your dough is done when the tart get crispy and when you can see all the caramelization of the dough and the caramelization, also, a little bit of the onions on top. We are going to grate some Bottarga to give a little bit of fish flavor, but also the salt. Know Bottarga is very salty. And when then Bottarga's on, this is our onion tart, like in South of France. When you taste together, when you have a bite, you have the crunchiness of the dough between your teeth and you have the crunchy, crackling in your mouth, and you have also the sweetness, the savory, onion compote, mixing with the dough so it's really crispy and soft, like a symphony in the mouth. I really hope, when people are going to eat the onion tart, bring back memory, because a lot of people went to South of France and they are going to remember: "Ah! I had this dish when I was in South of France, with my glass of rosé on vacation and it was great!" I love making this dish because I love sharing, cooking, food with people, celebration, that's what's all about food, really bringing people together and sharing.