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Chef Amanda Turner of Austin's Juniper restaurant created the Tortellini in Brodo under the guiding principle of using the entire animal. It's entirely delicious.

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Transcript

- The tortellini en brodo represents whole animal butchery. We're using the blood, the bones, the skin, the heart, and the meat. And I wanted to make a dish where you really utilize the entire pig. My name is Amanda Turner, and I'm the chef de cuisine at Juniper restaurant in Austin, Texas. We utilize Central Texas ingredients to create a Northern Italian inspired food. We get our pigs from a local farmer, they are called Free Fleeing Farms & Fabrication. They specialize in using the Mangalitsa and Heritage breeds. The flavor is a lot more pronounced, and the fat is also very delicious. So, it makes utilizing the whole animal a little bit simpler whenever all the parts are tasty. Snout to tail cooking is really honoring the animals that you get, and using as much of the animal as possible. This dish especially represents that. Whenever you get a whole animal, it makes you have to think creatively about the product and how you're going to utilize it. When you're telling someone that they're eating pig heart, or skin, or blood, it can be a little bit off putting, but whenever you utilize it in a dish such as tortellini, it's more difficult to discern the different parts, and eating them together in harmony really is delicious. Blood pasta is a pretty traditional technique in Italy. Instead of whole eggs, it utilizes egg yolks, and blood as the thickeners of the pasta itself. First thing you're gonna do on a clean surface is add the Durham and semolina flours. And the reason we use two different flours is for texture. They have different protein content, so they create different textures on their own. Once you've combined the flours together, form a well in the center of the flour. Add the eggs to the center of the flour, and then add the pork blood. The reason we use pork blood is because it has a high protein content, and it adds a richness to the dough. Then add olive oil to the flour, and mix it all together. The eggs, the blood, and the oil, with a fork until a shaggy mass forms. Once the dough is starting to come together with the fork, go ahead and knead it by hand. This is how you're going to make the dough elastic enough to roll through the pasta machine. You know the dough is ready whenever you've mixed it for at least three minutes, or until it is firm to the touch. Then you're going to place the dough into saran wrap or plastic wrap, and let it rest for at least 30 minutes, and up to overnight. The tortellini filling has a lot of ingredients in it. The idea was to balance the offal and the regular meat, with some sweeter and umami and floral ingredients. The first thing we're gonna do is grind all the ingredients through a grinder with a small dye. First we're going to do the raw pork, followed by the cooked pork. Then add the grilled pork heart, and the braised skin. Finally, add the caramelized onions to the grinder. Mix everything together. The texture you're looking for is similar to a sausage before cooking. Add the house miso. We use miso because it brings out a lot of the umami and richness and flavor. It's also slightly sweet, so it's a good balancing. Add the Sambuca and the rendered lard. The Sambuca adds a great anise flavor and is traditionally Italian, and the lard is for texture. The last thing we're gonna add to the tortellini filling is julienne mint marigold, sage, black pepper, and salt. Mix the ingredients all together thoroughly with your hands. You want to be sure to incorporate all the ingredients until the mixture is nearly homogenous. Once the filling is completely mixed, set it aside and that's what we're going to use to fill the tortellini. Tonkotsu broth is a very traditional broth from Northern Japan. It utilizes the bones of the pig, and also the skin and the cartilage from the bones through intensive rendering. To start the broth, roast your pork bones and chicken bones on a tray until they are brown. The reason we roast them is to bring out some more different flavors from the bones instead of having them be bland. Add all of your roasted bones to a large pot and cover with cold water. Then, put on the stove and then we're going to simmer it for 24 hours. The first 24 hours is to release some of the collagen from the bones, and develop the flavor. Then we're going to add the charred onions and garlic to the pot, and continue to simmer the broth for another 24 hours. The reason for this is to allow the fat and collagen to come completely out of the bones, and form a homogenous mixture. Strain the solids out of the stock. And the stock should be white in color and creamy in consistency. We're going to season it with salt to taste. And set the broth aside until you're ready for plating. It's time to finish the tortellini. Once your dough is rested completely, we're going to go ahead and roll it out. It's time to sheet the blood pasta using a pasta roller to a thickness of a seven. The reason we roll it out to a seven is because the pasta is doubled up on itself, you don't want it to be too thick in the final product. Cut sheets into 16 inch long sheets, and then from there you're going to cut them into two inch by two inch squares. Add a dollop of filling to each square, about the size of a dime. And shape the pasta into tortellinis, and then place onto a tray. We freeze our pasta to prevent oxidation and ensure freshness over time. Now it's time to bring everything together. Bring a pot of water to boil, and add salt. Remove the tortellini from the freezer and add them to the salted, boiling water. While the pasta is cooking, heat the tonkotsu broth. When the pasta is al dente, remove it from the water. The reason we cook it to al dente is because no one likes mushy pasta. Add some of the pasta water to the saute pan. Add butter to the saute pan, and coat the pastas with the water and butter mixture until they are completely glazed and shiny. Now it's time to plate. Add the tortellini into a flat, white bowl, and then we're going to garnish it with flowers, and also mint marigold leaves. Finish it with the tonkotsu broth, and the mayu oil. The mayu oil is a burnt garlic oil that adds a lot of flavor and depth. And that's our tortellini en brodo. The flavor of the tortellini en brodo is very rich, and bold, with hints of sweetness from the filling, and also some roastiness from the mayu oil. It balances sweet and savory, and people love this dish because the experience of eating it is truly unique. It utilizes a lot of different parts that maybe they're not used to, but also it comes together in a way that is elegant and delicious. I think tortellini en brodo satisfies those adventurous eaters because it is definitely not what you would expect of something that contains blood, or bones, or any of those other parts of an animal that might traditionally make people a little squeamish. And it really captures the story of snout to tail cooking, and also our philosophy here at Juniper.