Upgrade to Tastemade Plus to enjoy this video

Try it free!
Shop Tastemade

What Happens When Bacon & Eggs Meet Pasta?

What Happens When Bacon & Eggs Meet Pasta?

Frankie's World - Sn 1/Ep 5Frankie's World - Sn 1/Ep 5

Create a free account with Tastemade to save recipes and videos!

Save

While nobody is certain of how carbonara came to be, this combo of bacon, eggs and pasta is glorious.

Carbonara

Ingredients

  • Mezze rigatoni

  • 3-4 ounces guanciale

  • Olive oil

  • 2 egg yolks

  • 3 ounces grated pecorino romano, grated

  • Black pepper

Instructions

  1. Bring a pot of salted water to boil. Drop the rigatoni into the boiling water and cook 1 minute shy of the recommended time.

  2. Cut the guanciale into equal-sized strips about the width of a #2 pencil. Add a splash of olive oil to a sauté pan and add the guanciale. Cook until deep golden, even a bit burnt.

  3. In a small bowl, whisk the egg yolks.

  4. With a minute shy of the al dente time on the pasta, scoop a little bit of the pasta water into the guanciale pan and a little into the whisked eggs to temper them.

  5. Add the pasta to the guanciale pan and toss together. Add the whisked eggs and toss again. Add the cheese and continue to toss until melted and combined. Add black pepper, serve and enjoy.

email

Email

Facebook Comments

Transcript

- Carbonara, a creamy, pepper-flecked, Italian pasta staple. Only it's not made with cream, ever, and it might be as American as Italian. Let's find out more. - [Announcer] Frankie's World! - How's that pretzel? Some say that carbonara was a simple dish invented to feed the hungry coal miners. Carbona is coal, carbonara, of the coal miner. Others say that bacon and eggs, the main two ingredients in carbonara, were put in there because the hungry Italians were exposed to US Army rations during World War II. - I don't speak Italian, but I think that mother gonna eat me. - A third story, and this one is my favorite. - [Woman] Cut people! - [Frankie] After months of filming in Cinecittà, Rome, the American actors were tired of the same food. So the chef made something with American ingredients. - What do you got for me today, Geppetto? I'm sick of your red glop. - Today I make something really special, just bacon and eggs with pasta, so you don't feel sick for home. - It's delicious, thank you Geppetto! - Thank you, but don't call me Geppetto. - [Frankie] Whatever man. American breakfast, bacon and eggs, Italian lunch and dinner, pasta! - Hi, Giavnno, what's for lunch? - Hey, it's bacon and eggs with pasta. - Guess what, those are just three of many unproven stories, there are others! One of a Napolitano businessman, with a dish called Unto Uova, which means grease and eggs, maybe he invented it. In the 1930s, there was a group of anti-fascists called Il Carbonari, maybe they invented it. No one can seem to agree on where this dish came from, but we do know, it's delicious! - [Announcer] Story time! - So what makes simple dishes like carbonara, so deep, so delicious, so unctuous. It's preserved pork, also known as bacon. Humans have been on this planet for tens of thousands of years, that's tens of thousands of years of incremental improvements across all spectrums. We live in the future. We have a car. You have underwear. You have a refrigerator. If the year is human time, it's December 31st, and the fridge was invented yesterday. You know, before that if you wanted meat, you had to chase it around, and eat it raw. Once we figured out how to control and create fire when we wanted to, we were able to cook our meat. The downside was we had to eat the whole animal in one sitting. - I am full! - Oh my God, I can't eat another bite. I got a meat sweat man. - I know but we killed that entire mastodon. Perhaps if we had only killed half and allowed the other half to run around for later consumption, that would have been smart! - We got a saber-tooth right there judging us right now, we better finish these things. Which is a good bone? - The ball-joint is great. - Okay, okay. - Yeah. - Eventually, we realized that if we wanted to save food for later, we had to quickly dry it out, with either salt or smoke, and even in the Year One, the Greek historian, Strabo, was writing of Babylonians way before him, that were drying out their bats to eat later, which makes very little sense, 'cause bats are so small, I don't know why you couldn't eat them in one sitting. You see water is life's building block. Without it, nothing can survive, nothing can grow, nothing can live, and that's exactly the point, because when we're preserving food, we wanna kill everything. We don't want anything to live, otherwise you get this. All that mold, that's life thriving on moisture. You gotta remember, water is the building block of life. What we want, are these. Yep, dried out. Intense flavor. Which brings us to bacon, the raisin of meat. Undeniably, the star of all non-vegan food porn, and Guanciale, Italian bacon, coming from the cheek, rather than from the belly. Both of these are salt-cured. Yes, you can eat them raw, good. The real magic happens when it hits the pan. Ah! So what's the point Frank? The point is that man, fire, meat, one way of cooking. Man, meat, salt, pulling the moisture out, curing it, enabling raw food to be consumed. Think beef jerky! But when you take that cured meat, that doesn't need to be cooked, and you add it to fire, you get meat, fire, salt, and those three things become greater than the sum of their parts. They become magisterial! - [Announcer] It's cooking time! - Today we make a carbonara. Carbonara is a dish that there's no record of before World War II. There's all kinds of myths and legends about it, Americans, Italians, working to get bacon and eggs, Italian lunch put together, coal miners, actors of coal miners, black pepper. At the end of the day, the Italians and the Americans, neither one of them can actually agree on what the recipe is. There are some recipes that say only Pecorino Romano. There are some recipes that say 50, 50 Parmesan and Pecorino. There are some that say only egg yolks. There are some that say a combination of whites and yolks. There are some that say spaghetti, some that say rigatoni. I think it just needs to be creamy, and delicious. We always start with ocean salty water. Very nice, Poseidon would be proud. See this is Mezzi rigatoni. Stir it around, now we go over to the Guanciale. This is an off-cut that's cured. If you can't find it, go to pancetta. If you can't find pancetta, go with bacon. So what I do is I freeze my Guanciale and that makes it just a little bit easier to cut, because it's so fatty. A tiny bit of olive oil is gonna help that Guanciale. Now you can come in with your Guanciale. Make sure both sides get a nice little cook on them. Keep lettin' those cook. Alright now eggs. I think you just start with two egg yolks per person. So, you just wanna whisk up those eggs real good, and then the real key to getting this all to -- Poseidon is here! Hey it's good to see you again. Listen, I've already done the salty water. - Hey man, I'm not here about the salty water today. - What are you here about? - You don't want to put the eggs in the pan, you're not makin' some kind of scramble. - I'm not makin' some kind of scramble! - Yeah, you wanna put the water into the eggs. - Yeah, yeah. Bring the temperature up real gentle like. - And then just toss it! - Just toss it. - Air, fat. - All those good things. - Yolks Yeah, all those good things. - Cool, so I probably have enough for two, I don't know, you want some? - Oh... I'm double-parked buddy. Oh, I've been there. Alright, well thanks Poseidon, see you later. Carbonara for one, I suppose. Alright, let's get back into it! When the pasta is al dente, when it's almost ready, when you've got like a minute left to go, you wanna take some pasta water. Whoo hoo! You wanna cool down your pan, because if you put eggs right into that, you'd have a frittata. You heard Poseidon, we don't want a frittata. So bring the temp of the pan down. Here we go, let's do what Poseidon said. A little pasta water, a little fork. A little pasta water, a little fork. A little pasta water, a little fork, okay, bringing up the temp, nice and slow. Pasta in pan, here we go. Give it, give it a little toss. Get all the fat movin' around, nice. Come in with the eggs. Don't be afraid of it being too watery. Don't, but move it quickly, really quickly. This is where the creaminess happens, just by itself. At this point you come with your Pecorino Romano, and you can just kind of try and work that in, something like that. Mezzi rigatoni, no egg coagulation whatsoever. I'm very proud of that. Black pepper, super duper important. I mean, that is just beautiful. Hmmm, best one I've ever made. That's it! Perfectly creamy carbonara, except there's no cream in it. It's only like 70 years old. It's a combination of American breakfast and Italian ingenuity, that created this crazy mutation of a delicious dish. It's call for celebration man, and the only real way to celebrate is with a meat cleaver and shakin' a bottle of prosecco and you just kind of get the bubbles and... That's absolutely gorgeous. Come on, how can you beat that? I will answer that question for that you. You cannot beat it. And to the Kardashians, hold as far away as you can! This warms the prosecco. We don't want to do that. We wanna keep it cool, like this, you know. Hmmm.

Coming right up

Autoplay
  • placeholder

    placeholder

  • placeholder

    placeholder

  • placeholder

    placeholder

  • placeholder

    placeholder

  • placeholder

    placeholder

  • placeholder

    placeholder

  • placeholder

    placeholder

  • placeholder

    placeholder

Tastemade App

To save this video and more, Download the Tastemade App