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How Colonel Sanders Conquered Japan

How Colonel Sanders Conquered Japan

Frankie's World - Sn 1/Ep 9Frankie's World - Sn 1/Ep 9

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Frankie shares the history of fried chicken, explains the KFC phenomenon in Japan, and whips up a spicy, Nashville-style chicken dish.

Frankie’s Hot Chicken

Ingredients

  • For brine:

  • 8 cups water

  • 1/2 cup kosher salt

  • 1/3 cup sugar

  • 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns

  • 2 bay leaves

  • For chicken:

  • 1 chicken wing

  • 1 chicken breast

  • 1 chicken thigh

  • 1 chicken drumstick

  • Oil

  • 4 eggs

  • 1 cup flour

  • 1/2 cup matzo meal

  • 2 + 1 tablespoon yellow curry powder

  • 1 tablespoon black pepper

  • 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper

  • 1 tablespoon hot paprika

  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar

  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic

  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder

  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

  • Thick-cut white bread, toasted

  • Sour pickles

Instructions

  1. In a 4-quart sauce pan, bring the water, salt, sugar and peppercorns to a simmer. Add the bay leaves, then transfer to a brining container and refrigerate. When cool, add the chicken, cover, and allow 2-6 hours of brining in the fridge. Remove bowl from fridge and let sit at room temperature for 45 minutes before breading and frying.

  2. Fill a Dutch oven halfway with peanut, grapeseed or canola oil. Heat to 370°F.

  3. In a bowl, beat the eggs. In a separate bowl, combine the flour, matzo meal and 2 tablespoons of the curry powder.

  4. Remove the chicken pieces from the brine (discard the brine) and dry with paper towels. Starting with the largest piece and working your way to smaller ones, dip each piece of chicken into the flour mixture, then into the egg mixture, then back into the flour mixture before adding to the fry oil.

  5. In a small mixing bowl, add the black pepper, cayenne, paprika, sugar, granulated garlic, turmeric and salt.

  6. Cook chicken to an internal temp of 165°F; remove and set on a wire rack. Allow to cool for five minutes. Meanwhile, toast your bread.

  7. Using the ladle, take about 1/2 cup of the fryer oil and pour into the spice mixture, stirring with a fork. It should combine into a fluid paste.

  8. Transfer the chicken to a medium mixing bowl. Put on gloves, pour 80 percent of the spice paste over top and massage well with your gloved hands.

  9. Place the toasted white bread on a plate. Stack all 4 pieces of fried chicken on top of the bread. Pour the remaining spice paste over the top. Finish with pickles. Enjoy!

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Transcript

- It tastes like chicken. I mean, that is a line that will set you up for success and it has set the chicken up for success because it is now the most consumed meat on the planet. - [Host] Frankie's World. - The scientists say that the epic we're entering right now will be geologically defined by man's impact on the planet, so they're calling it the Anthropocene, because man is anthro, but the fossil record will be all chickens. We eat 60 billion of them every year and what is the preferred method of cooking said chickens? - Fryin'. You can't beat fryin'. No G. Fryin' meat's been around since the medieval times. The West African and the Scottish people's been fryin' chickens since before the Old World met the New. Even before Kentucky. You know, not long ago, eating fried chicken was for special occasions only. Sort of like the opposite of lobster, which before the 1920s was so economical, you could have it just any old day, but now you could have three buckets of my fried chicken for the price of one lobster, but not in Japan on Christmas. - Why is that? - Because in 1974, I lost a campaign in Japan and ever since, my chicken's been the only doggone meat to eat on Saint Nick's day. People line up for hours to get a selection from my premium menu at 70 buckaroos a pop. - What? Why? - Well, let me break it down for you. You see, Japan didn't have much of a yuletide tradition when I arrived. They don't eat those big dry birds over there. - Turkeys? - Right. Yuck, and by and large, they aren't Christians either. Good people nonetheless, but Christmas dinner just isn't the huge deal that is back home in Kentucky. Any matter, the year was 1974. Japan's economy was booming and they were very receptive to all things American, like rock and roll music and Levi's denim and good old Colonel Sanders, for that matter. Now would probably be a good time to tell you that the me that caught on fire back then, it wasn't actually me. No, it was a simulacrum of me. You see, the real me was back in these United States, having sued my old company and opened a competing house called Claudia Sander's Dinner House, after my dear wife. It just didn't take off in the same way. No matter. The year was 1974 and it was glorious because I unleashed upon our Japanese brethren Kentucky. Kentucky for Christmas. - Boneless. - All I want for Christmas are my two fried tits. You know, the original Kentucky Christmas dinner came with wine and sold for almost $50 in today's money. Now it costs 70 and they give you champagne and cakes. We've got over 1,200 franchise locations in Japan and all kinds of themes that go with them, like adult Kentucky Fried Chicken. They serve pasta and beer. We even have a Route 25 Kentucky Fried Chicken with a full whiskey bar, but the best part of this whole thing is the bottom line. You see, Japan generates 10 times the revenue in December that it does every other month of the year. Doesn't that sound good, Kris Kringle? - Ho ho ho. You've been a busy pitch man, Colonel. - I have indeed. It was all a matter of selling an alternate version of history. You see, the prevailing wisdom in Japan is that Americans eat fried chicken on the 25th of December, but when you tell them that KFC locations are most likely closed on the 25th and that Americans don't eat chicken at all, it absolutely blows their minds. One of my great joys is that the Japanese simply call my great chicken Kentucky, but I ain't done innovating yet. Listen to this. I heard that some of our Jewish friends enjoy Chinese food on Christmas and that got me to thinking. Maybe my popularity in Japan could be reverse engineered here. Sushi for Hanukkah. What's that? - It's kugel . - Not tonight because I got the dreidel roll. You see, it's got salmon, tuna, and avocado on the inside and the outside is covered in my secret teriyaki sauce and covered with fried crab. - Well, actually we don't eat shellfish. - Well, that's okay because I also have this little diddy from Japan, pork katsu. - Well, actually we don't eat that either. - Well, what do you eat? - [Group] Kugel. - There you have it, the story of the Colonel's insane popularity in Japan at Christmastime and that, I don't know what that was. Science. - Here are three ways to cook chicken, are you ready? Let's do it. The first is poached chicken, boiled chicken. Remember, chicken and humans are both, like, 70% water, so when you put the meat into the water, it's like it's reuniting with old family friends. Flavors go out. The chicken flavor kinda goes down. The water flavor goes up and it all becomes an equilibrium of, like, okay flavor, but there's no browning. There's no delicious skin. Not that it's not great, but it never gets above 200. It's just not that exciting. Let's talk about roasting a chicken. You see, when you roast the chicken, you're putting it in an oven that is twice as hot as boiling water. It's like going into a sauna, so what happens? The bird starts to sweat. Water and fat go out. The skin dehydrates, gets crispy. You get the Maillard reaction, so sugars begin to caramelize and get this wonderful browning. It's both healthy and flavorful, but if you fry a bird, not only do you get wonderful crispy browning on the outside, but all this bubbling, that's the sauna thing. The water's vaporizing, it's coming out and it is being replaced by this oil. So the fat content goes up, which means that the deliciousness goes up. The bird's clearly getting excited, but this can take a long time, which is why there is patent number 3,245,800 by Colonel Harland Sanders, which describes a pressure frying system. 15 pounds of pressure, which brings the boiling point of water up, which makes the bird cook faster with less grease retention. It's a wonderful thing. Is it any more delicious, no, but it's faster, which is really good if you wanna start a chicken chain, a franchise, and cook birds faster than other people. Food for thought. It's cooking time. - What we're making today is not fried chicken. It's hot chicken. Hot chicken, which is the new kid on the block for people like me has been around for more than 70 years. The black communities in Nashville, Tennessee, they've been making it since 1930 basically. We are gonna make it right here right now because it's delicious and it's gonna knock your socks off. So let's start with all-purpose flour. Matzo meal, this is what we make matzo balls with and it's gonna give us a really crispy lovely crunch on the outside of our chicken and here we have some curry powder. Everybody's hot chicken recipe is all about the spices they put into it. You can use whatever you want. So let's mix these three together. Fantastic, eggs. Ooh. Boom. Right onto my foot, extra points. Okay. So here we have our chicken, which has been brining in salt and sugar and bay leaf and black pepper and that's super-duper important, to brine the chicken first because it makes it very very moist. Okay, so just dry this off just a tad bit. Then you wanna come into the flour 'cause if you go straight into the egg, the egg doesn't really have anything to cling to, but if you go into the flour first and then into the egg, you get more egg and when you get more egg, you have a better barrier between the fry oil and the chicken meat and that means it's actually gonna be less oily. Drain off that extra egg. Here we go, ready? Nice. Oil's at a solid 370 right there, which is wonderful. This is very slippery. So the breading and the flour gets void of all moisture and develops little microscopic air bubbles in there, which you feel as crunch and crispiness. Look at this. Crispy golden deliciousness. Right onto the rack. And yes, you need a rack, you can't put this on a plate 'cause if you put it on a plate, you've got chicken and plate and then you create steam and then steam loses juiciness and eliminates crispiness. This allows air to circulate all around. Gorgeous. Fucking gorgeous. So here we've got black pepper. We've got cayenne pepper. We got paprika. We've got salt. We've got granulated garlic, which I know what you're thinking. Why not just garlic powder? 'Cause granulated garlic is thicker and gives you more texture, I like that. Here we've got tumeric powder and we've got some more curry powder and we've got some brown sugar because sweet things are delicious. Very gorgeous, mix that up. Are you ready for the secret of hot chicken? This is it right here. Oh baby, see, now that hot oil opens up all these spices, the aroma's insane, but it also makes this really really hot 'cause if we just put water in there and then we put it on here, we lose the crispiness, but what are we doing? We're putting 300 plus degree oil on top. It's a crazy ballgame. That's gonna be spicy. I think this is the best way to do this. Chicken into bowl. Hot. Temperature hot. Didn't occur to me that that would be a thing. Right onto toasted white bread, as is tradition, to soak up all the juice and all the spices. Temperature. Skin gets to stay crispy this way with the super-duper hot oil. If you used tongs, you'd be ripping apart this extra delicate crunch that we've got on top, so you've gotta use the hands. Wanna see a trick? Look, take the dirty glove. Crumple it in the ball. Single disposable packet, huh? Thanks, Dad. Can't have hot chicken without pickles, so I say we just throw them in there like that. Yum. There it is. It's my take on hot chicken and you can use any blend of spices you want and really get to any level of heat that you want. The point is get those spices in hot fry oil so that they become one with the crust and make sure that you put white bread underneath so that all that stuff is right there. Oh my god. That's delicious. The heat is coming. It's so good. It's spicy, it's juicy, it's sweet, smoky. This is so good, it makes me wanna lick my fingers. Merry Christmas. ♫ Merry Christmas

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