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Argentinian chef Luciano "Laucha" Luchetti heads to the remote lands of Tierra Del Fuego to explore how people use the primitive power of fire in their cooking and craft.

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Transcript

- Fire can mean a number of things, from love to transformation. From passion to warm social gatherings. In the most primitive way, fire can bring shelter and protection, or provide cleansing and even destruction. As one of the four basic elements, fire is at the beginning of it all. My first encounter with barbecue was when I was 15 years old and I saw my brother making an asado for his friends. I was amazed by the way he worked with the fire and was very inspired by him. Since that day I fell in love with this ritual. The next week I gathered all my friends and made my first asado. It was terrible, but I knew that if I continue cooking I will get better and better each time, so I started sharing my passion about asado on the internet, and that's how began. And now I'm making asado nearly everyday. I'm so lucky to live my passion everyday. That's why I'm taking this trip with my friends to Tierra del Fuego, land of fire. Ushuaia is one of the biggest cities in Tierra del Fuego, and also one of the coldest of Argentina. Almost 15 years later today I'm traveling to the south of the south to experience a new perspective of this element. History tells that Europeans first explored the islands during Ferdinand Magellan's exploration of the 1520s, and they name it after sightings of many bonfires built by the natives. This is the southern tip of South America, so I'm starting here at the end of the world and the beginning of my journey. From experience, I know that starting a fire in the middle of the snow isn't easy, so I made sure to grab the best wood from around the area to start the fire. Then, I dug a whole to make sure to get to solid ground. I was lucky the winds were not very strong but I had to stay away from the melting snow. - Meeting Vicente was the most unexpected but fortunate thing of the trip. I couldn't believe that a man that made handcraft knives, my passion, fire, asado, knives, was living there in Ushuaia. He opened the doors up of his house, of his workshop also. The place was spectacular. He used recycled stuff that he found in the street or that people were about to throw away. When he showed me the metal file and told me I wanna make a knife in your honor, I wanna make you a knife, a personal knife, for me it was like the best thing someone could give me. Speaking with Vicente made me realize I had lost my connection with the true essence of asado. The true beauty of this ritual is really connecting with nature. Getting back to the basics. That's why the crew and I decided to make a whole lamb in a cross, one of the most traditional techniques in Argentina, where you have to wait for at least five hours for it to be ready. That's why patience is one of the most important virtues of an asado. In this trip we also met Facundo, a mountain climber who's passion is making ceramics. He invited us to his workshop in the middle of nowhere. I really believe that the most important part of a barbecue is not the food itself, but the experience of sharing it with friends, family, people you care about. The more asados and experiences we share with the crew, the more united we felt. As days go by, I feel more connected to the primitive side of things. I'm so thankful for what fire brought to my life. I work with fire everyday and in barbecue, my biggest passion, it is the main component. I guess honoring the asado is my way of being grateful and getting to know more about this powerful element. Watching the sunset on this land, everything makes perfect sense. It really feels like a land of fire. Victor lives in Ushuaia. He's one of the few remaining descendants of the Yagan tribes. Really passionate about telling me about his culture, his tribe, his family. I think that he really feels part of that tribe, of that history that his family has lived all those years, 6,000 years ago. When he told us the story about how the tribes survived, they were nomads so they had to travel a lot, and everywhere they went, they had a small fire inside the canoes. I tried to cook something very special for Victor, something really traditional from Ushuaia. We had a live santolla. And I also thought that cooking with the water of the Beagle Channel was perfect because you need salty water to cook the santolla. So some of the people there in Ushuaia told me that if you don't cook with the water of the channel, it doesn't have the same flavor. This trip to Tierra del Fuego was fascinating. To live this experience was incredibly satisfying and humbling. Not only do we have the chance to try the local food, but we also met some great people. Meeting Facundo, Vicente, and Victor made me realize that living in the city everything goes so fast, but you take a lot of things for granted. They spoke about their work with passion, about their ancestors with passion. Maybe this is what I was trying to find on this trip, connecting with fire again, with asado, with my passion. The team and I worked under crazy climatic conditions and by the end, we all felt more united. We were lucky enough to get to listen to inspiring stories like Victor's and the history of the Yagan tribe. It was very moving and made us think a lot. We were reminded to appreciate the small things. It's amazing how something so simple and ancient is still a key for our lives, at least that's what fire is for me.

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