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- Welcome to Make This Tonight. I'm your host Frankie Celenza and tonight we're gonna start off by covering all the essentials that you need in your Asian pantry. - Do you like Asian cooking at home? Then I'll show you what is essential ingredient you should have in your pantry. Let's get started. First, let's talk about the rice. We cannot have Asian cuisine without the rice. It's most essential thing you have to have in your pantry. So we have a variety of rice right here. Purchasing rice is really depending on what type of it you like. Do you like regular, just what should I say, regular sticky rice? Or do you like fluffy rice? Or do you like super duper sticky rice? If you just want to buy something can use for everything, either serve as steamed rice or serve as fried rice, medium grain rice is actually way to go because it can perform literally anything, like all purpose flour. But if you really like Thai style super sticky rice, like almost rice cakes texture, then short grain rice, very short grain and sweet rice, this is what you want. And if you like fluffier rice, go for the jasmine. They are amazing for fried rice, they don't stick to each other. It is amazing if you like those fluffier texture. - Why get takeout when you can make your own Thai rice bowl at home? Ground turkey, cucumbers, and mint. I'll show you how. I'm gonna start by slicing my shallots, and I have a large cast iron skillet coming up to heat. I like shallots for their mild onion flavor. Thinly slice it. And I also have pot of brown rice that I cooked, germinated brown rice. And I'm using germinated brown rice because it's a little easier for you to digest and you get more of the nutrients. Okay, to my skillet, my pan, I'm gonna add a little vegetable oil, which is a neutral flavor. I'm gonna add in my shallots. Cook these just until they begin to soften and sweat a little bit. Just a minute or two. This dish is kind of like a larb salad but I made it into a rice bowl. Time to add in ground dark meat turkey. And then just cook this until it's browned, breaking it up. So I'm using dark meat ground turkey but you could use ground pork, ground beef, ground chicken, it's very versatile. Let this cook a little bit longer and while it cooks, I'm gonna prep my veggies. So I have three green onions, I'm gonna cut off the ends. And this'll be one of my garnishes that go on top of this brown rice bowl. And then I'm gonna slice it on a very hard bias. Adds a nice little crunch to the bowl. Okay, so that's done. Set that aside. On to my English cucumber. Use about half of this. And I'm going to dice this up, so I'm gonna cut it lengthwise and then I'm gonna cut it into maybe three or four long pieces, depending on the width of the cucumber. Then I'm gonna dice it up. I like using English cucumbers because you can eat the skin and the seeds. And then I also have one red chili, which I'm gonna thinly slice. It will be a garnish as well. Adds a nice pop of color and, obviously, spicy. Okay, those are ready. Let me check on my turkey. So while that finishes cooking, I'm going to chop up my mint, which I will add off the heat so it stays nice and bright green. So I have everything ready for my bowl and to finish this, so let me check on the meat. Think it's ready. Turn down the heat a little so my soy sauce doesn't completely evaporate. Actually gonna turn the heat off. There's enough heat in this pan to continue cooking. Add that. These cast irons stay so hot. Grate in two garlic cloves. And then about one inch of ginger. Ginger is hard to grate, it's so fibrous. Let's mix this through. Like I said, the heat from the pan will just cook this ever so slightly. Smells so good. I'm gonna add in my mint. Stir that through. Hits that hot pan and I immediately smell it. Alright, I think I'm ready to plate. And my cooked brown rice is ready and waiting for me. I let it sit for a little bit and then I fluffed it up. See, it's not stuck together, it's nice and fluffy. Gonna put a little of that in the bottom of my bowl. I'm gonna add some of the ground turkey. This is one of my go to weekday meals. I'll make the brown rice, I'll make a big batch of this turkey, and then all I have to do is I come home, I heat it up, I combine it all together, and then I have dinner in under 10 minutes. Just saves me time and I don't have to think about it. Okay, so rice, ground turkey. Gonna put some of the cucumber and then the green onions. Followed by some bean sprouts, which are really nice and crunchy. They don't have too much flavor but they add a really nice crunch. And then a few pieces of the red chili. And then I have some roasted seaweed sheets, which you can usually find in the grocery store. And I'm just gonna tear up and put in the bowl. So you can kind of, you can pick it up, scoop some of the rice, scoop some of the ground meat, take a bite, or you can shred it all up and put it throughout the bowl. But I kind of like the idea of having a couple pieces of it on the side that you can just pick up your food with. And there you have it, my brown rice bowl with ground turkey, cucumbers, and mint. I have to take a bite. You have the rice, the ground turkey, the veggies, a little heat from the chili. Just perfect. Make it, I hope you do. - How many noodles is an oodle of noodle? Oodles of noodles? I think it's a lot of noodles. You be the judge of it. This next block is called Oodles of Noodles. - For the noodles, here we have rice noodles. It's gluten free. It can be made as a soup, stir fry. And you can find very different size of it. Some people prefer this thin size, some people prefer wide size. It's really depending on your taste. I prefer thin, this is small size, for soups and the more wider one for stir fry because they just work better with that stir fry sauces and oil stuff. We have this egg noodles. This is, everybody knows egg noodles, right? You have a lo mein or a chow mein, stuff like that, it can be stir fry, soup as well. I prefer this like with maybe like wonton egg noodle soup, it's really good, or making chow mein or lo mein with the vegetables and stir fry with the oyster sauce or soy sauce like that. It's really, really delicious. And we have soba noodles and udon noodles. Udon noodles is pretty much same as just wheat noodles, so wheat flour and water, just shape it different way. It's a shape more thicker side. And soba noodles is made with buckwheat. So buckwheat is more, how should I say, more of a health benefit for you. I use a lot for cold noodles, cold noodle salad, or stir fry. And the udon, it can be all purpose actually. It can by hot stir fry, cold, or soup. And back over here, this big bag is Korean glass noodles we call dangmyeon. It's made with sweet potato starch. If you love chap chae, the Korean stir fry noodles, this is what you need to get. - To make soba noodles is actually really simple, so we'll start with our buckwheat flour here. To which I'm gonna add just a little bit of all purpose flour. I'm gonna create a well in the center so we can start with about 90% of the water needed, so all that gets mixed in. When the texture resembles wet sand just like this, then we can add a little bit of salt to the mix and then you can start using your hand to kind of combine everything to make sure everything becomes a nice soft and smooth dough. Once you can hold the whole mix with one hand, we can go ahead and transfer it to our countertop here. So I'm gonna use a little bit of tapioca starch just to kind of help make sure nothing sticks too much. And then we can go ahead and knead this for about five minutes. The whole point here is just to get a nice smooth, consistent dough so that when we cook it, things don't break apart. Once we have a proper and combined dough just like that, when you stretch it out, it pulls apart really smoothly, you can go ahead and make a ball out of it. And we're just gonna section it into little disks. So what we want to do here is make a rectangular shape so that when we cut through it, we get these nice long soba noodles. So you can go ahead, roll out one ball, flatten it out. And then we're gonna use the rolling pin to kind of get it the shape that we want it to be. Once you have something that looks like a rectangle, we can go ahead and roll it up. Just very lightly, you don't want to squish the noodles. And then we can go ahead and use your knife and just do nice little thin strands. You can use the help of a pastry cutter here, just to kind of get those nice little thin noodles. When I went to Japan, this noodle guy was doing this for about four years and one bowl of soba would take him close to 30 minutes to make, which is pretty impressive. Mine are not gonna be as pretty, but they'll be nice and thin. Now all we have to do is pull these apart very carefully, make sure we don't break them. Usually here you'd buy soba noodles at the supermarket. They usually sell these green tea kind of buckwheat noodles and you'll find them in most Japanese groceries as well. But I think it's always more fun to just do it at home. It's very therapeutic and you can mess around with the flavors more and it's more fun. Once all our noodles are cut up nicely, nice long strands, I'm gonna put a little bit of salt in my boiling water here and then we're just gonna go ahead and put all our noodles inside. And we want these to get a nice bouncy texture when they're done. Once our noodles are cooking, we're just gonna make a really quick sauce for it after. You can do some, you can make some hot soup with some dashi stock or you can do what we're doing now, just give it a nice little oily coating so that when you eat it, you have all that flavor from the buckwheat that just will complement so nicely with the different added flavors that we're adding here with a little bit of soy sauce, some mirin for some sweetness, just a tad bit of sesame oil. And finally, we're gonna grate about one to two teaspoons of garlic and ginger inside our mixing bowl. And mix all that together. Alright, so these look about done. What we're gonna do is we're gonna keep some of the water there because I like using that as a binder for the sauce. So we're just gonna strain them straight into the bowl. And these are great as they are or you can put the simple sauce that we did today. You just want enough to kind of coat everything. And toss that with just the help of the spoon. And just to give it a little bit acidity, we're gonna add some scallions right on top. You can kind of mix them in if you want to or just leave it just as is. And you're done, you just made soba noodles at home. - You could either buy the pad see ew in a restaurant or buy these five sauces for the same price and make it 50 times. Let's get started. First thing you need to do is get a large pan and put it on very high heat. It doesn't need to be a wok but you definitely want something with sloped sides that you can pan toss or attempt to pan toss. So some garlic. Just slice it up. This is a dish where you really have to get everything ready beforehand because it's so fast. You cannot be cooking and chopping. Then you could attempt to slice some ginger, but I actually think that the microplane is pretty awesome. It gives you both the juice and like the stringiness of the ginger. If you're using the microplane, probably like half as much ginger as garlic. Some Chinese broccoli, broccolini, broccoli raw, just something to give it a little bit of green, a little bit of bitterness. And use more of this than you think because it cooks down to nothing. Here we have pork chop. Technically, we're making a pad see ew mu. In Thai, mu means pork. So it's thin slices. I mean, this is gonna sear on both sides really quickly. Now we have to make our sauce. Starts with Healthy Boy. You can see right away that it is not the consistency of a soy sauce. Sweet, dark, slightly saline sauce. And I like to do two parts of that to one part oyster sauce, combined with this. Now you've got something sweet that's also salty and briny. Then you add a little bit of Japanese shoyu. This is actual soy sauce. And then lastly, this is fish sauce, also very thin. It's basically anchovy water, so this is seasoning the dish. Next you have palm sugar, sugar from the palm tree. It's more like a caramelized sugar, if you will, but in Thailand they make a lot of palm oil and palm sugar. Lastly, we have rice noodles. This is a noodle made from rice flour. And I've had these soaking overnight, I have not boiled them. They're gonna cook and steam in here a little bit. We have, you know, these big pieces of greens and we have these big pieces of pork, so you want, just like an Italian cook, right, you want a noodle that matches those large sizes. So it's really important to heat up the pan as much as it can. What happens is the metal pores start going like this until they're eventually so hot that they stay open. Then you hit it with the oil, like that. Oh baby. See how hot it is? Okay, garlic and ginger go in and you can see once you smell it, which is right now, the pork goes in. No joke. The other thing that's cool about the wok is if you put stuff up on the sides, it's a little bit cooler. So you can push the garlic and ginger up to the side and sort of let the pork have this really hot spot so we can sear it. So... Mixing it in a little bit. You can see the pork's getting a little bit of color in some places. We want a little more before we continue. You want to have color on your pork because that caramelization is flavor. Once we add this, which is gonna bring all kinds of moisture, the pan temperature's gonna come down and there's gonna be no possibility to get the brownness on the meat. We can come in with the broccoli. We can come in with some noodles, believe it or not, right on top like this. And they're gonna bring all kinds of water in addition to actual real water. So we got a little bit of water in the pan. See that? The greens have reduced to nothingness. The pork is steamed through. Let's come in with our seasoning. So nice brown color. Let's do a single egg. Right in there. And again, just a little mix. We want the egg at the end but we don't want it to really cook too much. And hit it with a little sriracha. So the dish is delicious. It's sweet, it's soft, it's savory, and it takes three minutes to cook. Guys, the very first time I made this, I just had a recipe from Thailand, I had never used any of these ingredients before, and it came out great. So really the key is get everything in place and then just go for it. Put the sauce at the end so it doesn't burn. And that's it, you can do it. It's a great thing to have in your repertoire. Listen, I hope you've got a fan nearby because we're about to turn it up with Seonkyoung's nuclear fired noodles. I'm hot already, baby. - I am back with nuclear fire spicy chicken noodles. Let's get started. So this sauce is from the Nuclear Fire Spicy Chicken ramen package. This sauce is coming with it, so we are using one of the sauce to marinate the chicken. Just coat it evenly. It looksalready. We are going to let it marinate for overnight, so the chicken tender will suck up all the spicy nuclear flavor all inside. Now we are going to make the nuclear fire spicy sauce. Into the cold pan, I'm going to chop up some green onion. So this sauce got to be spicy but same time, it can be flavorful and delicious too, you know what I mean? Into cold pan, make sure it's not heated yet. And some onion. I'm also going to thinly slice the onion, put it into the cold pan. Chop up some garlic. And goes to the pan. This is extra spicy Korean chili powder. And some black pepper, some dried Thai chili. I'll finally add some oil and turn the heat. We are gonna let all this fragrance vegetables to infuse their flavor to the oil first. That's why we are starting from the cold pan with cold oil. When you make this recipe at home, make sure your hood is on because just you breathe in this chili air, oil, you're gonna start coughing crazy. When you get this, this is time to add some chicken stock. Okay, now let's add all this nuclear sauces. Because this is not spicy enough, I'm gonna add some serrano pepper, fresh serrano peppers. Chop that up, in. The sauce is ready to go. Just simmer until the sauce gets thickened, about five minutes. Now I'm going to just keep them warm and going to go grab my chicken and fry them up too. Alright, let's fry up our chicken. Heat up my pan with oil first. Now I'm going to put some tempura powder into chicken. To dust it. Coat the chicken with the tempura powder evenly. Now I'm gonna crack two eggs. Little salt and pepper. Beat them. Panko bread crumb right next to you. And right now I'm going to dip one chicken tender at a time to the egg and coat it evenly. Then place on a Panko breaded crumbs just like this. Place the chicken. Perfect. And while the chicken is cooking, let's drop our noodles. So one from the Nuclear Fire noodles, I'm going to just drop into the boiling water. Alright, my chicken is done. I'm going to set aside and let's bring our sauce back here. Remember, oops, the devil sauce we made earlier. I'm gonna drop the noodles into the sauce and just toast them real quick and then set aside. Let's grab my hot sizzling pan over here. So it's been heating up for a while. You can see the smoke over here right now is very hot, be careful. Now I'm going to add the sauce we made earlier. And the noodles that we coated with the sauce already, let's put in the middle. Top with fire spicy chicken tenders. And I'm going to let Tastemade office people to taste it. We will see how they take it. So you ready? - Ready as I'll ever be. -Alright, let's get into it. - Oh man. I haven't even finished chewing it and... I feel like a dragon right now. - [Seonkyoung] You're crying. - I never cry. Do you have any milk? - I think I need - She's chugging it. - Alright, here we go. Mm-hm. - Mm. It's good, it's very delicious. It's also like swallowing a fireball, like my mouth and my throat are on fire and I could eat a bowl of this, I think. - Really? - Well, yeah, because there's nothing left. There's no taste buds, you know. Like my mouth is on fire. It's as on fire as it's gonna get. Okay, something new is happening now, by the way. - Okay, what is it, what is it? - Now like breathing is very spicy, you know, and I'm starting to shake a little. - Oh my gosh, Sam did amazing job. Thank you so much. Guys, if they can take it, you can do it at home. Challenge yourself and let us know, right? Right? Alright, thanks for watching. And let's talk about this corn starch. Corn starch is always real, real essential. You definitely have to have in your pantry because it's thicken up the sauce, it keep the moisture from the meat when you're marinating together, or you can dust when you deep frying some other stuff. It crisp up really, really well so definitely, definitely have to have corn starch or potato starch if you can find it. For sesame oil, in Asia, at least Korea, Japan, and China, when we call sesame oil mean it's toasted sesame oil. We never use white sesame oil for particular reason. And little couple drops goes a long way. This is amazing. Rice vinegar. I always like to have a white vinegar, rice vinegar, two together, because rice vinegar is very mild. When I want like a really pungent, sharp vinegar flavor, I use white vinegar for my recipes, my Asian recipes. But for regular or those Oriental dressings or for sushi vinegar, stuff like that, it's definitely rice vinegar is way to go. Let's talk about some soy sauces. I understand if you go to Asian store, there's so, so many soy sauces and I heard a lot of my friends says that they get really overwhelmed. "Which soy sauce should I get?" Let me tell you. Do you like Korean cuisine? This one is what we use all purpose soy sauce. We call jin ganjang, it's darker in color, it has slightly sweetness. If I have to have one soy sauce in my pantry, this is what I'm going for. Before I move onto the Chinese style soy sauces, let me talk about the variety of soy sauce. There's light soy sauce, regular soy sauce, premium soy sauce, sweet soy sauce, medium dark soy sauce, dark soy sauce. Like too many kinds. So light soy sauce is probably one that I use most for Chinese stir fry or seasoning reason. So if you really love Chinese cuisine, definitely go for the light soy sauce first. And then if you want to buy another soy sauce, different types of soy sauce, next one I will go for is dark soy sauce. This one is for the color and more little definition dip flavor. So this one actually for you, invest one bottle like this and you can use it like years because you never use like table or cup of it because it's super dark and little bit goes really, really long way. Trust me, because I have like this bottle, I've been using like two years. And you have no idea how many food I'm cooking daily with this, so trust me. We have this sweet soy sauce. If you like mie goreng or nasi goreng, those Indonesian style stir fry noodles or a stir fry rice, this is essential ingredient but honestly Indonesian has their own really special ABC brand, so definitely get that. Along with that, the second sauce that you use the most is the fish sauce. Oh my gosh, I just want to like cherish this fish sauce. It has such an amazing, amazing flavor. Those umami that like, that just, that flavor that you want from Asian cuisine, it's amazing. And if you love cooking a lot of Vietnamese, Thai food, definitely have to have it. And I really like this particular brand. It is a little more sweeter side than other fish sauce and it's a little more milder fish flavor. That's why I really, really love it. This is maesil chung, it's a fermented green plum. And in Korea home cook, we use this a lot instead of sugar because it gives really just natural fruity sweetness and little tang. It's just like our secret ingredient that we don't tell anybody. Rice wines. I love using rice wine in my cooking because whenever alcohol evaporates, they evaporates with this unpleasant smell from the meat and bones. In Korea, we use soju a lot as a cooking wine because it's probably the cheapest rice wine that we can get in Korea. Not in United States, it's quite expensive here. But whenever we drink soju, not like this, but after we drink it, some of the leftover, we always keep that for the cooking. So if you have leftover soju, do not ever throw away. Use it for cooking. Nowadays, you can find mirin really, really easily at regular grocery stores at Asian cooking section. So if you're having hard time finding sake, soju, or any other rice wine, mirin is the way to go. And if you're really into cooking Chinese food, As you can see, the color is a little more darker and also the flavor is a little different too because they have little more like this bitter flavor that gives really authentic flavor to the dish when you're cooking Chinese food. - Check it out. Rice provides an instant burst of energy. It stabilizes blood sugar, it slows down free radicals and the aging process, and it keeps you regular. - You don't have to wait for the next time to go to your favorite Thai restaurant to enjoy some sticky rice. I've got some tips on how to make it at home so you don't end up in a sticky situation. I know there's good sticky situations and bad ones, but I'm gonna show you the good kind. The steamer method. Traditionally, Thai sticky rice is made using a bamboo steamer that's kind of shaped like a cone, but I find that using a steamer pot and cheesecloth does the job. First, add your rice to a bowl and give it about two or three rinses under cold water until the water is not so cloudy. Then fill it up with water again and let it soak for at least one hour. Some people like to soak it overnight but I don't because it tends to break up the rice and then makes really mushy rice. This rice has been soaking for an hour and I've already drained it. Next, grab your cheesecloth. If you don't have this, you could also use a clean kitchen towel. Just take your steamer basket and line it with that cheesecloth, pop in your rice. Smooth out the top so that each grain cooks evenly. Fold over the excess, then place it in a pot of water, cover it with a lid, and allow it to steam for about 15 to 20 minutes. When it's done, just fluff it up with a fork. Next up is the rice cooker method. Just like the steamer method, you should rinse your rice until it's mostly clear but you don't have to soak it for the rice cooker. Toss it into the rice cooker, followed by some water. For two cups of rice, I use 2 1/2 cups of water. Then set it to cook. When the timer goes off, go ahead and check the doneness. If the rice is still a little more than al dente, cover it up, leave it off, but just let the residual heat cook it for another 20 minutes. Finally, the microwave method. This one's great when you want to cook just a small amount of rice. So I've got a cup here. Just like the two previous methods, rinse the rice until it's mostly clear. Then allow it to soak for at least 20 minutes. You don't need to drain the water, just keep the water in there and test if there's enough. So you need about a quarter inch from the surface of the rice. The rice should touch the tip of your nail and the water level should hit halfway here. I know it's not like an accurate measurement, but it's what we Asians do. Now cover it with plastic wrap and microwave for four minutes. Carefully peel back the plastic and fluff it up. Repeat the process until it's fully cooked. When you compare all three results, you can see that the steamer and microwave method cook the grains a lot more separately, whereas the rice cooker method is still good but is a little more clumpy. And now that you've become an expert at making sticky rice, there's so many ways you can enjoy it, sweet or savory. I like it with some barbecued meats and a nice tangy sauce made of fish sauce, lime juice, and chili. Or you can have them as a dessert, the popular mango with sticky rice, with a really sweet yummy coconut sauce. We actually made a video on how to make mango with sticky rice right here on Tastemade, so be sure to check that out. But right now I'm eyeing these beautiful ribs along with this awesome sauce. I hope you guys give this a try. I'll see you next time. Remember to just eat that sticky life. - Every time I'm in Japan, I go absolutely crazy over onigiri. The last time I was there, I actually tried one that did not have the nori leaf and the topping was right on top. So that's what I'm gonna try emulating today. And the big difference here is instead of using just steamed rice, we're actually gonna make nice steamed grilled rice cakes. So all those flavors will come together beautifully. So I'm gonna start with that base sauce, so I've got some soy sauce, some rice wine or some sake, brown sugar, and then some miso paste. Go ahead and just mix all that in together. I'm just looking to dissolve the sugar that's in there. I've got a pan that's nice and hot on the grill right now. We're gonna go ahead, throw on some of my ground pork. And what I'm looking to do here is just release all that fat that's in there, all that oil. When the pork is half cooked, I'm gonna go ahead and add just two tablespoons of our sauce and we're just gonna let that caramelize gently. Next, we're gonna go ahead and form our rice cakes. So I'm gonna oil my hands just a tad bit first, grab the rice, and make different ball shapes out of it. I oil up my hands to make sure that the rice doesn't stick too much to my fingers, but at the same time it'll coat the rice balls perfectly for the grill. It's really important that your grill also is nicely oiled up for this. Then we're gonna go ahead and flatten them just a little bit and place them right here on the grill. And what I'm looking to do here is just really warm up the rice all throughout and at the same time just get some nice kind of brown, crusty marks on it. Then we're just gonna go ahead and flip our rice cakes. Careful not to burn yourself like I always do. And then we're gonna take a little bit of sauce and then just brush the top of the rice cakes with it. And cook that down for another two minutes. Gonna go one last flip, just so I can put the sauce on the other side as well and it can slightly caramelize on the rice. So while these are finishing up nicely, we're just gonna go ahead and chop up some of our spring onions here. We're actually gonna use mostly just the green parts, chop everything up nice and thinly. So I'm gonna go ahead, grab my plate, and we're gonna start off just with our rice cakes here. Again, try not to burn yourself. Once these are on a plate, grab your fork and then just spoon some right on top here. Then we're gonna finish everything off with our spring onions here. And this is a very different way of making grilled rice cakes, but trust me, it's just as delicious and once you make them, you'll get so addicted. - I love spicy food, how about you? If you love spicy, I love you too. So the first chili sauce, this is a sriracha. Sriracha, sriracha! You have to dance with the sriracha dance. I love sriracha so much, see, I have my own sriracha song and I have a sriracha T-shirt. This is probably the purest chili sauce you can find at the grocery store because it has only red chili, a little bit of vinegar and salt, that's it. And it can perform pretty much everything when the chili sauce calls on the recipe. And it can be sauce, it can be like a drizzle on top of the dish, it can be marinated, it can be stir fry, anything you can think of. This sauce is really, really useful. And the second chili sauce I use the most is justor chili garlic sauce. It's more chunkier, you can definitely see this chili seeds inside and it looks really pretty when you're using into your dish because you can see this chunky chili. It looks, I just love it. So I like using this as a dipping sauce or into my soup or marinating my meat and stuff like that. And chili oil. If you go to grocery store, you can buy just regular chili oil like really clean drained, just red color oil. But that's not fun for me. I like to use this chili oil with chili flakes inside. It's more spicy and it looks actually better, I would say. Looks just prettier after I use it in the dish. And the other sauce that we use very often in Asian cuisine is this bean paste. This one is miso, is probably the most popular bean paste you can find in United States. In Korea, we have a very similar one that we call doenjang. Miso is really fine paste but doenjang is more of a chunkier side that you can still see little bean stuff right there. So I always say, if you like miso soup, Japanese cuisine, and you're having more milder taste buds, go for miso. If you love Korean food and if you love the pungent flavor from the bean paste, go for doenjang. Along with doenjang, we have gochujang, Korean red pepper paste. This is what it looks like, the gochujang. It is spicy, sweet, tangy, has like a really deep flavor and it's really, really thick. In Korea, we use this for anything and everything. We make stew with it, we using as a dipping sauce, we make salad with it, we make dressings, and like pretty much anything and everything. This is kind of our heart in Korean cuisine, along with kimchi. So keeping up with the spiciness, I have this dried Thai chili or dried just red chili and gochugaru. I use gochugaru a lot for the color wise and the spiciness as well, but mostly color for Korean cuisine. Or making like a chili oil, homemade chili oil, I use this. And this dried chili. I use it very often when I really want those impact chili. The dried chili has a different kick on your throat, totally different style of spiciness than fresh chili or the chili sauce. So sometimes I prefer to use dried chili for that dry spiciness. And also it has this, the seeds inside, they have amazing, amazing dry flavor too which is I love. I use this very often for my stir fry. Also if you add this chili into the dish, it's really impressive looking dish, I would say, because they look gorgeous in the dish. Sesame seeds really is same thing as sesame oil. When we put sesame seeds, it's always got to be toasted sesame seeds. Whenever they're toasted, just flavor is totally different. This is Chinese five spice. For Chinese cuisine, it's definitely essential. It has the clove, fennel, star anise, cinnamon, and peppers. And it's super duper aroma. And the last, not the least, dried shiitake mushrooms. I use this really a lot, I always buy this big bag of it because I make a stock out of it when I'm making soups or making Korean stocks. The flavor is almost like a meaty, I would say. It can be substituted for actually beef stock. Definitely, definitely want to have it. I think that's about it for Asian essentials. So it's really soy sauce, fish sauce, rice wine, rice vinegar, toasted sesame seeds and oil, and rice, some kind of chili sauce if you like spicy, any type of noodles that you prefer, and some bean paste. So for more inspirations, go check out my channel, Seonkyoung Longest. And just go ahead into your local Asian store or regular grocery store to the Asian section. Just experience and just look around because there's so many recipes and so many things you can try and experience. So good luck, hope to see you next time. Bye! - I want you to just for a moment, think steep thoughts. Matcha is a green tea from Japan. It's been getting a lot of buzz lately and I'm not talking about the caffeine. Got some really nice stuff featuring matcha coming up and that's how we're wrapping it out today. Thank you so much for watching Make This Tonight. I'm Frankie, and you, you're you. - Hi guys, I'm Michel and today we are making a little quirky cute breakfast or snack called matcha butter. And it's a super quick, super easy, tasty, slightly sweet snack that you put on a rice cake and top with some beautiful toppings. Let's get started. We're literally dumping everything in here, smearing it, and topping it. We're starting with some unsweetened coconut yogurt and that's just gonna go right in. Our sweetener of choice today is honey but if you're vegan, you can use agave or maple. I like honey. To thicken this and hold it together, I have some potato starch here and I also have shortening made out of coconut. So it's completely vegan shortening, makes it really thick, really creamy. An important ingredient is that of cashew butter but it's important that you find the lightest color cashew butter you can because after we mix this with the green, if it's kind of a brown cashew butter, the color's not gonna be the cutest. Our most important ingredient, matcha. That's gonna go in. And then last but not least for a little bit of sweet vanilla flavor, you can do vanilla extract or vanilla paste. That's gonna go in as well. Now that this is a mess, we blend it. See if we can make this cohesive. Might have to open it and scrap down the sides a little bit because that matcha just likes to explode all over the walls. Let's give it another blend. Yes. It's looking good. I just got a little mason jar because this is enough for quite a few matcha rice cakes and you can keep this in the fridge for a couple weeks. So gotta spoon this in our mason jar. That didn't happen. This is what our matcha butter looks like once it's all combined and together. Took me a lot of different recipe tries to make this not look brown, but we got it. So now it's time to decorate. So we're just gonna scoop a little of this onto here like actual butter or anything else you put on a rice cake. Be generous with it too because you got your protein in here. This is great for the morning too because matcha is a super concentrated caffeine source. Because it's like green tea but instead of just the residue from steeping it, you're consuming the whole leaf. So once we got this on here looking all pretty, we get to decorate it. So what I have is I have black sesame seeds, coconut flakes, hemp seeds because I love hemp seeds, more honey, and some edible flowers. Isn't that adorable? This is where you just have fun. It's also like decorating cookies for breakfast. Next to it, I'm gonna do some coconut flakes. Some hemp seeds. These are also a great protein source. Alright, and last but not least, black sesame seeds because that plays with matcha well. And then I'm just gonna do a little bit of honey drizzle on top. And it ends up being kind of almost like a little breakfast cookie, but healthy. Let's try it. I am ready to get some sesame seeds in my teeth. Uh huh, it's a mess. But it's really good. What I really love about this is it kind of tastes a little bit like a cookie enough to get you excited to get out of bed in the morning, there's a little bit of vanilla, a little bit of sweetness, but also a ton of superfoods. So you can make this in advance, put it in your fridge, and you can literally have breakfast in 30 seconds. I hope you try it. - Matcha puppy chow. Sounds like dog food, looks like dog food, but it's actually damn delicious. Let's make it. Super simple recipe here. Got some water, heating up a pot. Make sure the water does not touch the bottom of that bowl. And to that, you're just gonna add some dark chocolate chips and Nutella. Oh yeah. This is my crack. Now just wait for it to get nice and melty. If you don't like dark chocolate, use white chocolate. It tastes amazing with matcha. And that is some luscious chocolate right there. Just gonna turn off the heat, take this over here. And while the chocolate's nice and hot, go ahead and mix in some butter. This makes it nice and rich, as if Nutella and chocolate wasn't rich enough. Once that's fully incorporated, go ahead and add some matcha. There's matcha in the chocolate and it's all gonna get coated in matcha. Next, the chow. I've got some Corn Chex Mix here. You can even make these gluten free by using Rice Chex. I like the corn because it stays crunchier much longer. Let's do a layering technique and put a little bit of Chex followed by a couple dollops of the chocolate, and then do that layer. Chex, chocolate, Chex, chocolate. But Jen, why can't I just throw it all together? Well, by doing this technique, you prevent a lot of breakage, so you can have whole pieces. So I'm thinking ahead, you know? Thinking of you guys, trying to prevent your struggles. You deal with enough in life, you don't have to deal with this. I can throw that all in. And the rest of the chocolate. So the goal is to get every piece coated. Take your time with this. Okay, that's done. Next step, we gotta make the coating. So I have a combination of powdered sugar and some more matcha. All you gotta do is toss 'em in the bag. Powdered sugar in. Matcha on top. Get a little bit of shake. You just want to make sure it looks like one color. It's easier if you roll down the sides of the bag before you throw the chow in, because it makes a wider opening. The wider, the better. Let's just toss that all in. Then roll the sides back up. Seal her tight. It helps if you leave a little air in the bag so you have room to mix. And shake. Yay, all the little bits are getting coated. Love that color. Gotta make this face. It helps. And we can take a peek. Are you missing any spots? Any bits need some extra loving? These look pretty good to me. It looks so good, each and every Chex Mix is coated in that matcha crack. Just pour it into this bowl. You can keep it in the bag and store it in the fridge and snack on it all week, or just pour it into one giant bowl and watch some Netflix. And there you have it, matcha puppy chow. You know what this calls for. The dog filter. Thanks, puppy chow.

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