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Nothing to Do but Eat in Genova | One for the Road

Nothing to Do but Eat in Genova | One for the Road

One For The Road - Sn 2/Ep 4One For The Road - Sn 2/Ep 4

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Frankie heads to Genova by boat, hopping from place to place, trying everything this oft-overlooked city has to offer.

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Transcript

- My name's Frankie Celenza. I'm an Italian cook, a storyteller, and a musician. My love for Italy goes deep, and I've always dreamed of flying solo to this beautiful country. I feel so Italian. This is probably one of the most beautiful things I've ever driven in my life. I can't wait to live la bella vita. We're on the Italian Riviera. It's absolutely beautiful. This is Porto Fino, one of the most beautiful ports in Italy, and we're heading to Genova, which is one of the most important ports of Italy. Dolce and Gabbana's house. You can see the very big city of Genova right there, but we're gonna take a quick detour to the small coast town of Camogli first because they've the best of focaccia bread. This is focaccia normale. When I travel, one of the most important things for me to experience is the local cuisine, and today's trip to Genoa is no different. Here at this ocean side foccaceria, I'm gonna see how one of my favorite breads is made to absolute perfection. Wow, nice. So the Italians have a thing called the denomination of protected origin, and it's a guideline, so he puts this stamp on it because it's been in made in the way that the food governing body says is the right way. Of course. Yes I would like to try. This cheese is so good. Now that I've eaten some of the best focaccia bread in the world, it's time to head over to the main event, beautiful Genoa. My goodness is this beautiful. And there's all these giant giant buildings because all the important families apparently lived here in their castles, the ones that like invented the banks and had the control of the big shipping companies back in the day. Let's go for a walk, what do you say? I wanted to come to Genoa first on my trip to Italy because it's so overlooked. I want to be able to discover all the nooks and crannies this historically rich city has to offer. So I was just told that these little side streets here, they're called caruggi. Never go to a place that has a menu in English if English is not the native language of that country because that means they're catering to tourists, and if they're catering to tourists, then they're ripping you off. And I'm headed to my very first cafe here in Genoa to test out that theory. We're gonna go try farinata, which I've never had in my life before because it only exists here in Genova, and this is the best place. What's this? Chickpea flour. - With water and salt. - Water and salt. That's it. Whoa. Okay, she said she wants to give me another fabulous typical dish from Genova. And they are, fried, achuga? Fried anchovies. Hmm. Me too. She's happy that I liked them. So the farinata, almost ready. Let's see it. It's fantastic. Wow. Honestly, it tastes like cheese. What do you say we do a little exploring? I gotta say, I just like getting lost. I mean if you get lost, you really discover stuff that makes you feel really really good. This is my kind of a parking lot, yeah. Scooter, scooter, scooter, paradise. It's gotta be one of the most interesting shops I've ever seen. It's coffee time. So here we are at Antica Sciamadda. That means the old flame. They have the best fried baccala in all of Genova. It's like fish and chips without the chips, and everybody loves fish and chips. I am Frank. Whoa, I'm in the kitchen. They let me in. Water, flour, salt, and yeast, and that's the batter. Fresh food out of the fryer. Can't be beat. Thank you, thank you. So hot. Very good. Fish and chips he just said. You see that? At Anticca Sciamadda, they also make a sweet version of the farinata. Let's check it out. He's blowing the impurities off the top which happens from the natural fermentation. That's cool. Milk, sugar, pignoli nuts, raisins, water, and chestnut, that's it? Similar from the farinata, soft on the bottom, kind of crunchy on the top. Wow. That is amazing. Now it's time to try the mother dish of Genova, which of course is pesto al genovese, and this chef here invited me to see how it's really made. Pesto originated from Genoa, and I'm excited to see how Alessandro makes one of my favorite foods the way it should be made. Okay, so we gotta clean the basil first. Okay, so you mix that first. Just oil, garlic, salt, and pignoli nuts. Beautiful. Ooh, so it's a sheep's milk cheese. Gorgeous emulsion. You can see that the oil is not separating from anything else in there. This man is a professional. That's so good, Alessandro. Very creamy. Mmm, with my first solo trip under my belt, I've gotta say, it's been more than I ever imagined. Meeting all these incredible Genovese chefs and eating their authentic local cuisines, this is what I live for. I can't wait to see what's in store for Bologna. The pesto is so so good that we need to, I need to just turn off the camera and go eat it. That's what's happening next. Thank you.

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