Sertodo Copper

Sertodo Copper

Showcase - Sn 1/Ep 5Showcase - Sn 1/Ep 5

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From Moscow Mule mugs to paella pans and flasks, hand hammered Sertodo Copper is as beautiful as it is useful.

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Transcript

- In the modern world, where so many things are made to be disposed of, our goods are made to last, and you can feel that when you pick one of these pieces up. What I love about working with copper is it's such a friendly, ductile material. It's a material that's been apart of the human hearth for thousands of years in so many different aspects, whether it's conducting electricity, used in rituals from ancient times, or modern day Moscow Mules. It just allows us to do so many different things with it. My name's Jonathan Beall, and I'm the founder of Sertodo Copper. One thing that Sertodo Copper very unique is our pride in our craft. Every single piece we make has its own unique touch and characteristic to it. Being a maker is about creating, creating material objects, but more fundamentally, it's about creating a lifestyle, creating a life. One of the principles of our business is really blending the modern and the ancient. I'd say that's one of the fundamental guiding principles of our design process. For example, our new cookware that we're workin' on. I wanted a little pan so I could make some nice crepes, maybe an omelet. We'll take some of our recycled copper, we have a sheet of copper, push that copper until it molds into the shape of, basically of a pan. We clean up the surface, if there are any surface imperfections on there, take that piece and then we do a tinning, a hot tin process, which is a traditional way that cookware has been lined so that you don't have any reactivity, which happens with heat, copper and acid. You don't want your marinara sauce tastin' like you're chewin' on copper wires. Take these special salts, you heat the pan up, throw the salt in there and it smokes, then you throw the bits of tin inside there and the tin melts like butter. And then wipe it all around and it basically bonds on there with the material, leaving a real thick layer of tin. We take that tinned pan, and we take it over to our stakes, and hammer the material. Then the copper gets hammered, makes for a more wear-friendly, durable surface. We'll position handles on there if we're makin' frying pan or a paella pan. Then, voila, to the house and start cooking with it. I think when someone gets one of our pieces, that it changes their relationship with the object that they've got. We put a lot of intention into the pieces that we make, which you can tell with every single hammer mark that goes in there. That's our work from start to finish, and when we make somethin', we want the person to use it, to get decades, generations of use out of these pieces. The first pieces that I made 20 years ago, people are still using today, and they can pass it on to the following generations.

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