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Pasilla Peppers In Oaxaca

Pasilla Peppers In Oaxaca

Sourced - Sn 1/Ep 8Sourced - Sn 1/Ep 8

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Guy journeys deep into the Mexican jungle to find a Oaxacan specialty: the pasilla pepper. Join him as he samples the entire spectrum of mole, and spices up a dish of his own with this richly-flavored chile.

Recipe

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Huevos en Salsa

Ingredients

  • 2 onions, diced

  • 4 garlic cloves, sliced

  • 4 chorizo sausage, meat removed

  • 2 cups tomato, purée

  • 1 teaspoon Pasilla pepper, paste (or sliced Pasilla peppers)

  • 6 eggs

  • 2 herb bunches (garnish)

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Instructions

  1. On medium heat add olive oil to pan, add diced onion and sliced garlic and fry till tender.

  2. Once tender add chorizo meat, break up with the back of a spoon and cook through.

  3. Add your Pasilla paste or sliced Pasilla peppers, then add tomato puree.

  4. Cook for 10-15 minutes till sauce has reduced a little and flavors have combined.

  5. Turn down heat, then crack in eggs one at a time and cook for 20 minutes till eggs are cooked.

  6. Serve with tortillas or bread.

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Transcript

- Welcome to Oaxaca, Mexico. How incredible is this place? Unbelievable. And it looks like we're getting led into the Mexican jungle, so I'm pretty excited. Let's go explore. Good day guys, my name is Guy Turland from Bondi Harvest and we're on our journey to source the finest ingredients we cook with everyday. We're here to find the people, the places, the land that produced the vibrant flavors that we eat. So, I've come to Oaxaca, Mexico in search of pasilla peppers, so come with me, let's go find the source. All right, let's be honest, who doesn't love Mexican food? So, we've traveled to the to try some of Oaxaca's epic street food. Spicy, it's got peppers on top Just making friends The honey first caught my eye and then I looked down and I saw a few worms going on. These little guys are found in the roots of the agave tree. I'll have taste. That's like a agave worm sauce. Here we go. It's obviously salty but it's chili. It's really nice actually. Let's try these. A big fan of cricket, but I'm not quite sure about this one. I think something got lost in translation. It's pretty good Salty, definitely spicy, it's hot. But as a chef, there's one here that really sparks my interest and that's the local mole. The Oaxaca region is sometimes known as the land of seven moles the most complex being the mole negro with over 18 ingredients. The heart of these flavored cocktails, pasilla peppers and a little bit of chocolate. I'm on my way to meet David and Eli. They're local restaurant owners and chefs and they're gonna teach me a little bit more about mole and how it's used. What do we have? What do we have for me? - - There's four different colors. There's green, so that's sort of light. This one? - Herbs, of course. - Herbs are fresh. - - Oh, yeah. That's so good. It is light, fresh, zesty. - This is - It's only corn with tomato and some chilies, it gives a very simple but also very fantastic flavor. - That dried corn. - We put it on the fire a bit. - Yeah. That's good. That's really good. And this one looks awesome, it looks tasty. It looks a little like. - [Voiceover] Enchiladas. - Enchiladas, yeah. - This is filled with beef and kind of a stew, made with beef and potatoes and with some olives. - Oh, wow. - And the sauce is very complex. - - This is awesome. I can taste like the cinnamon. - Mmhmm - Andcassia. There is one that I'm really pumped to taste. - Yeah, that's the good one. - The mole negro. - It's the most famous. - Basically it's tomato, chocolate, cinnamon, many fruits, raisins, You have to burn a tortilla completely to give a bit of more black color to this one. - There's burnt tortilla in there as well. - Yeah, also burned banana. - I wasn't expecting that Wow, that was good. That is so good. - Yeah. - It's very complex. - You like it? - The flavor that you said, it's a party in your mouth. It's like smoky, but sweet, like little bits of cacao chocolate. You can get that. - I told you, it's true. - It's awesome. I'm never eating anything else ever again They're all so good. So good. So these are the local markets here and this is where basically all the locals will come to get their ingredients, to make their different set of moles and different dishes and everything you need is right here. You know, you've got all your different kinds of dried peppers, you've got some raw cacao or coco here, which is so, so good. Some garlic, some cinnamon cassia, but there's one kind of pepper I really want to show you guys, it's around the corner. It's pretty special and it smells unbelievable. Let's go check it out. Look at this stuff, straight from the farm, bananas, tomatoes, limes, avocados. I'm so pumped to explore these markets and see what we find. Charcoal barbecues, local hanging cured maize chorizos. So this is a pasilla pepper and it's actually sort of dried out and then smoked over fire, so it's got like this, sweet, caramelized, delicious sort of pepper flavor with that smoky flavor on top. It's used for all sorts of you know, different moles and oh yeah, we're gettin' these guys. This is what I've been searching for, mole negro. It's delicious. It's rich, complex, sort of all the beautiful oils sort of stuck to your fingers, you can see there. You taste the smoky pasilla peppers in there too. All right, so we are literally going to the source of the ingredient. We're in the Mexican jungle. We're catching up with a local farmer to find out how we cultivates and turns these peppers into pasilla peppers. It's a bit of a trek but how gorgeous and exciting is this place. - - Show me around? - - I'm not quite sure what to expect because I'm being taken deeper and deeper and deeper into the jungle so I'm staying close, just in case he runs away Jumping trees. Can't believe the farm is so deep in the jungle. So, it's a bit early in the year for peppers, so these crops are still saplings and only just getting started. I'm just blown away with how the farmers have set up their crops in the middle of the dense jungle. So these are babies, juvenile plants. - At what stage do you begin to harvest the pasilla pepper plants to turn them into these? - - They just turn out so gorgeous when they're finished, like a dark sort of amber color, a gorgeous smell. How could you not love them? It's this mineral rich soil that makes these peppers grow so unbelievably well and taste so amazing. In between a valley, deep in the Mexican jungle, trees and mountains, cliffs as far as the eye can see and then there's sporadically corn that they've planted in amongst the jungle, and there's gonna be peppers down here. It doesn't get more organic than this. I'm gonna make a Mexican dish called juevos on salsa. The key ingredient is these awesome pasilla peppers. It's actually been ground into a paste with some garlic. First step is to dice up some onions. We're just gonna slice 'em straight in half. So, I'm dicing onions. Keep the root on. See, the onion is not falling apart everywhere. Nice and fine. Throw a little bot of olive oil into a hot pan. This goes straight in there and with the onion, we kept the root on. Garlic, and I would straight just take the root off and basically the whole garlic falls apart, makes it easier to peel. So, with a flat knife, the skin falls off and you're left with garlic. That's straight into the same pot. Now it's time for the chorizo. What we're gonna do is, gonna take the skin off. I'm just gonna put all this beautiful seasoned and spiced meat in there and cook that down. And in with our epicpaste, little rock star of the dish, made from those tasty, smokey, spicy pasilla peppers. Give that a mix. I'm gonna add some tomato puree in there as well. Two cups here, let all those flavors Come back to a boil and then we're going to crack a local egg that we just got from the chook pen outback. There's nothing fresher and better than local produce can give us. Put a lid on, turn it down to about a medium heat. Give it about 15, 20 minutes until those eggs start to cook and come together. All right, that's all done. Take it off the heat. We're going to garnish it with a few squash flowers that I found and some local herbs. That's it, huevos in salsa. It's time to eat it. Share it with my new friends. A few tortillas, couple of spoons, we're ready to rock and roll. Cheers. - - - - - After an awesome meal, it's time to eat some chocolate gelato. I'm going to serve it with this awesome pasilla pepper sauce, so it's a little bit smoky, a little bit peppery, and then with an awesome chocolate, it's going to be a wicked combination. So hot out here, it's perfect. What do you reckon? Thumbs up? - - Yeah. How awesome is Mexico, what an amazing experience. So many cool people and tasty treats. What an epic journey it's been sourcing the finest ingredients from all around the world. Thanks for joining us all season long guys and for more episodes of Sourced, make sure you check out tastemade.com.

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