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Strawberry Cheesecake In Yokohama

Strawberry Cheesecake In Yokohama

Tale of Kitto Katto - Sn 1/Ep 2Tale of Kitto Katto - Sn 1/Ep 2

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In Yokohama, Emmy meets bakers specializing in Western desserts that have become uniquely Japanese including Castella cakes and Yokohama cheesecakes.

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Transcript

- Here we go. Mmm. This one is my favorite. Hey, guys, my name is Emmy and I'm eating my way across Japan in the most unlikely way. I'm on a quest to discover Japan's unique Kit-Kat flavors from Tokyo's rum raisin to Shizuoka's wasabi. I'm tasting, exploring, and unwrapping what each region has to offer. I am here in beautiful Yokohama. Here to taste this flavor of Kit-Kat. Strawberry cheesecake. I'm not really sure why they chose strawberry cheesecake, but it's a cheesecake that we all know and love. Let's see what they say on the back. They say this is supposed to represent the foreign romanticism that's supposed to be associated with Yokohama. Let's give that a taste and see if there's any truth to it. Ah! The bar is a white one. Not chocolate at all, which shouldn't be surprising since it is cheesecake after all. Mmm, smells like strawberry scented erasers. Hmm. It's pretty good. The flavor is very cream cheesy. I'm surprised they actually got the cream cheese flavor in there. There's a touch of strawberry. Actually a good amount of strawberry, but I feel like you smell it more than you actually taste it. I actually think they did a pretty job at capturing that cheesecake flavor. Particularly at the very, very end. It's like, "Oh. Cheesecake-y." Fun and familiar. All right, let's see if I can find if there's any truth to this whole foreign romanticism here in Yokohama. I'm heading over to Castella Bun to investigate something called castella cake which is considered typically American somehow, but I've never actually had it. I'm really curious to see what it is and how it's supposed to represent something American. What is castella? Hmm. Right. Castella is a cake? It's a sponge cake. Sponge cake, but a custard. I'm from America, I've never heard of it. American servicemen that were on the base called it castella cake. I see, I see. How interesting. How did you start making castella cake-y? Hmm. Your father started it? - Yes. - Yeah. How interesting. In the same location, in the same spot? Really? And the same ovens? Is everything the same? There's a lot of history here. But you've made your own recipes? Hmm. Shrimp flavored castella? - [Shizan] Yes. - How was it? 400 years. I had no idea. Mhm. Then the recipe has changed to become something that's completely different and adaptable to the Japanese palette. It smells so good in here and I'm dying to taste your castella. Can we go taste it? Great. It's better to eat it three days later? Ah, okay. Freshly made. All right. Mmm. So good. It's got a spongy texture and you can taste the little candy pieces on the bottom. It's crunchy and nice and egg-y. It's delicious. Mmm. This is the way you're supposed to eat it. Yeah, it does have a different texture. Hmm! Mhm! Very different. They're both very light and spongy, but this one's a little bit, a little bit sticky. The flavor's delicious! Mmm. Oh man. Smells great. I smell coconut. Mmm. And toasted almonds. All right, here we go. Mmm! Mhm! This one's my favorite. With milk? Mmm. You can taste the coffee in there. But the coffee and the coconut it's a really good combination. Mmm, nice and toasty and sweet. Mmm. Really great combination. Delicious! This is where it's at. Yep. I'ma eat this whole thing. I haven't had lunch yet. Whatever. It's sponge cake. It's light. It's calorie free. I'm in Japan. Shizan, thank you so much for sharing your store with us and this delicious recipe. Thank you. I'm heading over to Gateau Yokohama to taste some Yokohama cheesecake which has an interesting story because it almost closed, but thanks to a loving customer who rescued it we still have Yokohama cheesecake today and I'm curious to see how this will match up to my expectations of what cheesecake tastes like. The owner's son, Masaharu Okayama, showed me around. Nice to meet you. Thank you so much for having me. You have so many beautiful things. Look at all these different types of cheesecakes. Which one is your signature cheesecake. Ahh, this one that says number one. May I try it? Ah, great, thank you. Wow. Look at this space. Totally unexpected. Check it out. I think those are oysters. Who would've thought part of a cafe. Looks great. So pretty. Mmm. It's got a very similar creamy texture as the cheesecake that we have in the U.S. But the flavor is quite different. It's not as sweet, but rich and creamy and you taste more of the cheese than the sweetness or any kind of cooling vanilla flavors. It's delicious. Mmm. Why is it called Yokohama cheesecake? Why are there so many Western sweets in Yokohama? Yokohama and Nagasaki where the gateway for the Western in terms of recipes, foods, and culture. What kind of city is it now? What kind of city has it become? Hmm. It's a very international city? Mhm, mhm. I feel that with the cheesecake and the coffee. It's delicious. Thank you so much. Yokohama is only 45 minutes away from Tokyo, but it has a completely different feel. It's a lot more intimate and small. I don't think there's a better example of this kind of intimacy I'm talking about than this cute little townhouse that's been converted into a cafe called Enokitei. The owner of Enokitei, Miho Ando, is going to sit down with me and explain to me why these Western buildings even exist here. Will you look at this stuff. It's so beautiful. This architecture is not what I expected to find here in Japan. But in Yokohama I guess you shouldn't be surprised. I think this is yep, I think that's it right there. Gosh, it looks just like a house. It doesn't even look like a cafe. - Hi. - You have such beautiful things. Hmm. Is this cheesecake? Two types? Ah, really? May I try them? Thank you. This is the rare cheesecake. Okay. Ah, it's so great. Mmm. It's delicious. They're wonderful. How did your mom come up with these recipes? Uh-huh. You grew up in this neighborhood? Ah, in this house? What a great story. What do you think of the future of this house? What do you think will happen? I really appreciate the fact that you have preserved this house the way you have. Yokohama was cool, I liked it. I really felt I got a real sense of the importance of it, you know, when we were by the water in the port and how that could be a literal gateway or an opening to other worlds and other cultures. Thinking about Japan's history in terms of opening itself up to the West. It'd been closed off like, "No, not interested in any business," in the sense of wanting to bring in people or a business. I liked it. There is that kind of foreign romanticism which I saw which is kind of interesting to see as a foreigner and seeing what the real Western stuff looks like, but then I was thinking about if you think about it in the sense of like you and I both are from The States and we go to some place like Butte, Montana and there's a cowboy culture. You can get into that sub-culture too. I can see how there's an adoption of a culture because you romanticize it. It harks into something that you fantasize is romantic and sweet, but then you take it back and you do something else with it. It's what they admire in that culture. They've adapted it and shaped it a little bit to make it suitable for their taste and it's Japanese now and it works for that culture. It's no longer Western.

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