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What happens when you mix travel with true purpose? Join Jane Coxwell and Capital One in finding meaning in every moment! First stop, Catskills NY. Sponsored by Capital One.

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Transcript

- [Narrator] Why do you travel? - Is it food? That's the best thing I've had in a long time. - Oh, it's so fresh. - [Male] Oh my God. - Is it adventure? - Hey! - This is really fun. - Setting sail. Or is it about making a connection? Y'all are amazing. Each episode, we will explore a different city. - And discover the power of purposeful travel to change us. - Look I did it. - I'm Jane Coxwell. - [Alejandro] Alejandro Toro. - [Noelle] I'm Noelle Scaggs, and this is Purpose Project. Presented by Capital One. - I am Jane Coxwell, and I'm a chef and traveler. I'm a natural. Did you see that? I'm really, really lucky to have done a lot of traveling. It's really been my passion. Travel is one of the greatest gifts that we have, and food has been my vehicles and my ticket to see the world, and I've been really, really lucky to do so. I live and work in New York City, and I'm on my way up to the Catskills, Hudson Valley area. I've been traveling, pretty much, for the last 16 years, and for the first time in my life, I'm considering a different lifestyle. Maybe buying a house somewhere, perhaps even opening a restaurant. I don't know much about the Catskills, Hudson Valley area, but what I do know is that in the '80's and '90's it kind of fell into disrepair, and now it's kind of being revitalized. With the help of Capital One's Purpose Project, I'm really excited to explore the area. I guess I'm really, really hoping that I'll get the chance to meet people, and have real chats with them, and really get a sense of what people are doing, and whether I felt like I could be accepted into the community. I'm starting my trip on the right track, literally. I'm meeting with Mary Joy and Alex, who gave up their successful careers to start a brand new business. They've turned an abandoned railroad into one of the area's coolest attractions. - [Alex] Okay. - [Jane] This is cool. - Off we go. It's surprisingly easy, right? This is unlike anything I have ever done. This is amazing. - [Alex] There's something magical about the railroad, right? - Yeah, seriously. I love it. And what were these tracks used for before this? - Many, many things. They've been here since about 1860. They've been used as a logging railroads. They've been used to transport wealthy Manhattanites up to their country estates. - [Jane] They've really been put to work. - Yeah. It's a real treasure to have these, and introduce a whole new generation of people to the magic of the railroad. - How are ya? - Oy. - Brake. - That was so cool. - What did you think? - I loved it. I've been smiling for a half an hour straight, and my lips are frozen to my teeth. - [Mary Joy] Awesome. - My mouth is dry. That was so great. - Jane, this is my wife, Mary Joy, - Hi, Mary Joy, nice to meet you. - [Mary Joy] Hi, nice to meet you. - She's the other half of the partnership, and actually, the brains behind the whole business. - So I guess that begs the question, how did this even come about? - Our family was living in Brooklyn, because we had, as our former life, owned a visual effects company in New York City. - Yeah. - And so I would go home and escape the world by plugging into Korean dramas, and I came across this couple pedaling down the track in Korea on one of these crazy contraptions, and I'm like, "Oh my God, that's our next life." I didn't know what it was, and a few months later I was in South Korea. - Oh my gosh. - Yeah, meeting the designer of the bike. - That is 100% the last origin story that I could have come up with for that. - [Alex] It's pretty crazy, right? - That's so cool. So what kind of people have you had riding? - It's for all ages and all abilities. Well we had families with autism ride a lot with us this year, and what's terrific is that, you know, it's just such a sensory thing. - Yeah. - So no matter what age and what abilities you have, I mean they can do it, can't they? - How have you guys found being the newbies in the community, and making a business and a life? - For the locals, it's great for them to see things that looked old and run down being put to use again. And they're like, "Gosh, that's a good idea." - Yeah. - Like, why didn't we think of that? - So how does it compare to your old life, and your old work, and do you miss it? - Well, you know, I had a lady come up to me and give me a hug in our first year. She gave me a hug and said, "This is the best time "I've ever had with my son." And my heart just melted. - Really special. - Yeah. And so you don't get that in advertising. - No one's come up and hugging you. - No, it's not very soul fulfilling. - Yeah, no. - It's quite courageous, because it's difficult to leave things behind. - I mean, you're here to make a difference, and I think following your dreams, no matter how hard they are, you have to do it. - I love it. - Good. - I love it. Thank you. I'm so in awe of this throwback railroad, that it's amazing to imagine all of the people who've traveled this path before me, and I'm really so inspired by the example of Mary Joy and Alex. What was really unexpected to me was how candid they were about how making this massive change has made them so much happier. - Woo hoo. - It really made me reassess what success is, and it really made sort of question what ways I could bring joy into people's lives like that. I love it. After a full day, I'm finally getting a chance to grab a bite. I'm headed to a popular spot called Phoenicia Diner. I've actually known about this place for years, but it's almost impossible to get a table. I'm meeting owner, Mike, to hear about his story. How he turned this old diner into, really, one of the hottest tables in town. - Well, welcome to the diner. - Thank you, thank you. - I'm glad you finally made it out. - [Jane] Yes. - Before we go in, though, I've got a little treat. We're gonna go fishing. Todd's a fly fishing expert. - I'm gonna fish, too? - You are. - Oh, that's awesome. - We're gonna try and catch our dinner. - Fly fishing. And then we'll eat it? - Well, yeah. - [Jane] I love anything that involves a uniform. - These look like they belong for someone with the longest legs in the world. Very excited about this. Good fit, right? - [Mike] I love it. - Back and forward, you're trying to keep that rod tip nice and high. Perfect. - Hello. - That's great. Hello. You're hired. - Even just being out here now, whether I catch something or not, is beautiful. - And that's exactly what I was saying before. - Yeah. - It's just the enjoyment of being out with nature. - Nature, yeah. I miss it so much. - Exactly. - I feel 100 times more relaxed than I did when I drove up. - Good. You're kind of a natural. - Really? - Yeah, I think so. - Would it make you sad if I caught a fish, and you didn't? - It would make me incredibly sad. - We didn't catch a fish, unfortunately, but I worked hard, so I think I've earned my dinner. It's cool to be back here. Can I make something? - [Mike] Let's give it a try. Let's see what happens. - [Jane] See how it goes? - Alright, I'll see you in a few minutes. - Okay, thank you. Thank you. It's kind of unlike me to step into somebody else's place and wanna cook, but I think one of my favorite things, at the moment, is that while you're cooking you can't do anything else. It's really a way to make yourself more present, and just do what's, literally, what's in front of you. And if you get to make things for other people, it's even better. I used to work on a boat, and walking into the diner I realized how much I miss cooking the freshest, freshest, freshest trout that you know has come from a stream really close by. So I'm a little nervous to give this to you. - [Mike] It looks beautiful. - Uh oh. - Perfect. Perfect. I am almost never on this side of the counter. - Oh really? - So it's a very, I'm feeling, yeah exactly. - [Jane] It's a weird feeling? - I'm having a power struggle. - Do you need anything? Would you like anything? - Exactly, no I'm fine. - Are you gonna pay? Any background hospitality? - No, and I think that's, again, part of the charm and the terror of this place. - [Jane] Yeah. - We had a weekend place up in the area, so we had been passing this diner for 24 years. - Never thinking you would own this, yeah. - But always, in the car, with the family, saying what a great spot. Somebody should really buy that place and do something with it. I didn't know how to cook. I never ran a restaurant before. - Can you cook now? - I can't. Could never do what you guys do. - That's a very nice thing to admit. It's so funny being here, as well. It seems like everybody knows each other. It's a pretty tight community, is it? - Yeah, it is, and we've all kind of got here at around roughly the same time. So we're all in the same kind of boat. I go back to my roots, in my Brooklyn youth, I knew everybody on my block. Today, Brooklyn, we're in a brownstone, and we're connected on both sides, and I don't know my neighbors. - It's such a good point, yeah. - And up here, we're miles apart, but we all feel connected. - Yeah. - Even more so than we do back in the city. - [Jane] Yeah. After years of traveling, and then living in the madness of New York City, where I don't even know who my neighbors are, I'm so drawn to this idea of laying down roots in such a tight knight community. And I love the idea of being here at a time when I feel like I could truly contribute to the revitalization of this beautiful place. - Right. - Thank you for organizing that. - No, thank you. - That was awesome. - I'm glad you guys came. - I loved it. I wish I had caught a fish, but I think you were standing on my line sometimes. One of the best things about traveling with purpose to me is finding unexpected places, but actually sometimes the second best thing is finding that perfect cup of coffee. - Hey, good morning, how are you? - Good, thank you. I'd love a coffee. - I'd definitely suggest a latte. - A latte sounds perfect. - Latte, please, to go. - Chilly out there. - Yes, it is. Yes, it is. So, visiting? - I'm visiting, yeah. I'm on my way to Stone Barns today. - Cool. Yeah, Stone Barn is a great place. We've worked closely with them. - Oh, you do? - We work with their compost program, so twice a week they pick all our spent grinds from the espresso and coffee. - Oh, really? - Take it up for the compost. - I could take for you, because I am going that way. - Nah, really? - Yeah, I can take some. - Sweet, sweet. - Yeah, yeah, yeah. - [Michael] There you go. That's fresh roasted coffee. Nothing gets inventory roasted. - That is smooth. That is delicious. Thank you, Michael. - [Michael] You still up for taking the grinds? - Yes, for sure. - Alright, tell Jack that Coffee Labs says hello. - No, that's very cool. Yeah, I will. - Safe travels and enjoy. - Thank you, thank you. Stone Barns has been a leader in the sustainable food movement. I've known about it for years, and their amazing produce feeds the onsite restaurant, often rated to be one of the best in the world. So I'm here at Stone Barns, and I'm so excited. It's like a New Yorker's dream, and like a chef's dream, double. I'm here to meet my friend, Brian Kelly, who set it up. We're gonna do a bit of farming, but I'm not quite sure how into it we're gonna get. I hope very into it, and I'm hoping to get a little dirty. Very excited. - Jane. - Nice to see you. - How's it going? Is this like the newest designer bag? - Hi, Brian. - I know I brought that. Hi, nice to see you. I brought the coffee grounds from the coffee place I just went to. - Oh, cool. - Have a feel, it's really heavy. - Smells good. I've seen you work in the kitchen, but do you think you can hang on the farm? - Well, I like getting dirty, so I think that that's a good thing. - Well, I don't. - I know, and I saw the white jeans and white shoes, so we look a little like not prepared, but I think, yeah. Why did you want to come here today? Have you been here before? - Yeah, this is basically the epicenter of farm to table. I actually just inherited my own mini little farm in the country side. - Ah, amazing. - So I kind of want to try, you know, sustainable farming for myself, a little bit. - Uh huh, yeah. - Let's go meet the farm director, Jack, who's gonna show us. - Nice, yes, that's great. - [Brian] I'm already getting muscles from this heavy bag. - [Jane] Yes, thank you for carrying the coffee as well, because I brought it all the way from town. - [Brian] This is heavy. Your new farm hands are here. - Brian, great to see you. - Good to see you, too. - Yeah, very well, thank you. - And this is my friend, Jane, who has a very special gift for you. - I picked these up at the coffee shop. - Oh, grinds. - Yeah, Mike at... Nice to meet you. - Thank you so much, Jane. That's great. So let's put this down here, and we'll take a look at some of these carrots. Grab it right from the base. Nice. - Oh wow, look at that. - Those are beauties. - Oh wow. - Jane, what would you make with these? Like a soup? - A soup would be good. Roast 'em and then, if you eat this, this tastes like carrot, as well. - Carrot pesto. - Yeah. - It's like a carroty leaf. Isn't that crazy? - Herbal, yeah. So have you ever gotten a carrot, and you're like that's the face of Jesus or anything? - There's a lot of strange looking carrots. - Oh. - [Jane] So Jack, where did your passion for farming and sustainability come from? - My folks had a small homestead farm. - [Jane] Uh huh. - And I was just really enjoyed being out in nature, and I thought, you know, the best thing I can do with myself is to grow food for people. But the most important thing to me is really that I'm caring for this land, and leaving it better than I took it on. - [Brian] Yeah. - What we wanna do, when we use the fork, is just put that in right along the edge, and try to get it down. You might even need to hop, and it cracks the soil. Here you go. - [Jane] Oh, I didn't expect it to be so hard. - Get it in a little closer to the plant, too, because you're on the walking path. It might be a little harder. - You've made this part look really simple. - You can do it. - Yeah. - It's like a pogo stick, kinda. - Without the bounce. - Right. - With millions of people living in New York City, and land being so expensive, is it even possible for the majority of people in urban areas to eat sustainably? - There's so much change happening, right now. And a lot of this has to do with the way that we care for land, and the way that we look at what farmers do. I mean we don't just grow food, you know. - Yeah. - What we're doing is acting as stewards. - Yeah. - So whether it's suburb or urban, or just outside in the rural areas around the cities that there's a lot of room to cooperate. - So who are these cute guys? - Well these are the rams to our sheep flock. Since they've eaten through most of the grass here, we're gonna move 'em on to the next spot, and give 'em some fresh ground to be on. Okay, now when you're walking around the sheep, just know that every little movement will move them, even just where you're standing, so. - Oh my God, I'm a natural. Did you see that? - [Jack] Well done. Everybody's happy. - I got the insubordinate ones. - [Jane] I loved spending time with Jack. His connection to the farm and the earth is palpable. He's so passionate about it. I think, as a chef, one of the things I took away is how I could be paying better attention to using everything. Using every little bit of what we get from the earth. Thank you, so much. - Of course. - Thank you, Jack. It's so great to meet you. - Thank you, Jane. - It was so special. Such an amazing place. My dinner spot tonight is more than a restaurant. It's an ever evolving art installation. I'm meeting up with former Brooklynites, Hannah and Carla. They left New York City to open Lil Deb's Oasis. It's a place where artists share their work, and more importantly, eat some seriously good food. They describe their tropical comfort fare as food that makes you sweat from places where you sweat. It is like an oasis. It's cold out there. It's colorful in here. What are you making? - We're making llapingachos today. They're a really delicious, ooey, gooey potato and cheese pancake. - [Jane] So what is Lil Deb's? - It kind of happened serendipitously. - [Jane] Yeah. - How we were able to open this space. This used to be a diner called Debbie's Little Restaurant, and we did a pop up here, and she was ready to retire, and she asked us if we wanted to take over, so yeah. - Oh wow. - We wanted it to be, like, an all immersive experience. We wanted it to be, you know, not only the food to be a representation of who we are and what we wanted, but the space and the music. - It's been incredibly rewarding to do this. - What's the community like that you've built, that you feel you've attracted? - It always kind of feels like a family reunion, where there's like the young and old, and like that person you haven't seen in seven years, and like your neighbor, and someone who might, like, be a little annoying, but you love 'em anyways, and you'd be sad if they weren't here. - So everybody, we've gathered you here to meet our friend, Jane. - So what does Lil Deb's mean to you guys? Like, what has it added to your life, and you think, to the community? - Definitely instilled like a new idea of what loving your friends, and like a community can be. Corny, but very real. - [Hannah] I love that. - Yeah, I think it's true. - But what's cool, I think, is that I think we couldn't have done it anywhere else but here. Because we're not, like, in a big city, we don't have to play by the rules. - [Jane] I'm so blown away by what Hanna and Carla have created here. It really does feel like more than a restaurant, it kind of feels like a family of strangers brought together by food and art. I really respect that they had a clear intention of what they wanted to create, and they weren't afraid of putting it out there, and knowing that people would connect with it. It's the last day of my trip in the Hudson Valley, and despite it being a bit rainy, I'm headed to Fishkill Farms, because there's really nothing more fall in upstate New York than apple picking. I'm meeting up with third generation farmer, Josh Morganthau. - So we're here in our cider room. - [Jane] Oh my God. Josh has actually lived in this community most of his life, so he's really seen the ups and downs of the area. So I'm really, really excited to hear from him what makes this place so special. - So this is Fishkill Farms. These are older trees that were actually planted when my grandfather was still managing the farm in the late '60's. - Wow, the late '60's. - So these are probably planted in 1968. - Wow, beautiful. - So they're a good 50 years old. - 10 years ago, he took over the farm from his father, and he's continued his mission of servicing the community with a CSA program, cider production, and harvesting over 270 acres of fruits and vegetables for local businesses. Whew, chilly. - Yeah, nice to get out of the cold. - Nice to be inside. - [Josh] So, right now, we are in our production barn. - [Jane] These are beautiful. - Yeah, little kohlrabi's. - Wow. - A lot of people haven't seen a brussels sprout on a stalk. - On a stalk, yeah. - But we harvest them this way. And then some spicy lettuce mix. This is mustard green. - Uh huh, yeah. - So I don't know whether you wanna try some? - Yeah, I'll try this a little bit. - Makes it spicy. A different type of mustard. - Mm hmm, I love this taste. - And it's mixed with lettuce, because the mustard on its own is really intense, yeah. - Whew, it's real mustardy. Oh my gosh, that was like snorting wasabi. Can you see my eyes are watering? - Yeah, yeah, they're intense. - How long have you been doing the CSA? - So we've been doing the CSA for about seven years now, and it's grown to around 300 members. - Oh, wow. - It's such a great way to connect with our community, and to get our produce out there. - I know you spent some time in the the city, but you've been here, pretty much, you're whole life. Is there anything you think that people should know about the Hudson Valley? - I think a lot of people live in the city, and they never get out of the city, and it's beautiful here. I mean it's just one of the most beautiful areas in the world. - [Jane] Yeah, in the world. - [Josh}And there's a, I think, such an amazing food culture that's been growing. - Yeah, with people doing really, really exciting, and creative, and like, individual things. - Yeah. - Like this farm is such an amazing reflection of you and your family, and like history, but each place is just so individual. What a cool time to be here. - Yeah, it is. - So we're in our doughnut room. - Mm, the smell. - [Josh] This is where we make around 13,000 doughnuts a day. - 13,000 a day. - [Josh] It can be up to an hour to get the doughnuts. - [Jane] To buy the doughnuts, wow. - [Josh] Would you like to sugar some? - Yeah, but mainly taste, but sugaring some sounds good, too. - Okay, well you have to put in your work to taste one, so. - If I have to sugar to taste. Okay, I'll do that. Oh my gosh. - That's good. And now, just grab some sugar, sprinkle it on top. There's no such thing as too much. - Oh, this is cool. Look at that. - So we have a full tray, but there's one extra, so. - Oh my God. The texture. - There's nothing like one, like when they are warm, and they're still right out of the fryer. - Oh my God. Whew. That's the best thing I have had in a long time. And I eat a lot of food. My last stop is a little bit unexpected, but definitely in the spirit of the fall season. The Great Jack O'Lantern Blaze. I am meeting Mike, the creative director, to hear how this whimsical event came to be. Thanks for letting us come and take a look. - [Mike] Well, thanks for coming. - I've heard really positive things. - The name of the event is called the Great Jack O'Lantern Blaze. You really need to just experience it, because this is an art experience. - [Jane] I'm really excited to look. - [Mike] Exactly. - I don't really know what to expect, so I'm excited. - [Mike] We feature over 8,000 hand carved jack o'lanterns. - [Jane] Wow, if I was a kid, I would lose it. - [Mike] We're located in Sleepy Hollow, so this is like epicenter for Halloween, in New York State, if not the whole nation. - Oh my God, look at that carousel. - [Mike] So it all kind of just happened organically, in that, we said let's do a jack o'lantern event with 5,000 hand carved pumpkins. - [Jane] Yeah. - [Mike] So the local economy is boosted, as a result of what we're doing here, but then we have local people carving. - [Jane] Yeah. - [Mike] So there's different layers of this kind of interconnectedness. - This whole thing is truly incredible. I can't believe that this is put together by local artists and children. It's amazing. It's an amazing testament to this community. People give of their time and their skills, and it's pretty epic, but it does feel like a lot of love was put in it, and the community has built it, and it's really special. Driving away from this experience, I actually feel a lot more thoughtful than I thought I would feel, you know, before I left, and as I was kind of planning the trip. All of the people that we met are so fulfilled and inspired by their individual projects, it made me really conscious of myself and what my purpose would be, what my contribution would be to society. Because I guess everybody that we've met has their really unique contribution. I hope that people coming along this journey with me will feel the sense of excitement that the people that I visited, that they feel about their projects. And I would really encourage people to seek out authentic experiences and meaningful moments when they travel. Every place you go changes you a little bit for the better.

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