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What's the best place to store eggs? Do tomatoes even *go* in the fridge? Hilary Duff's here to help you answer all of your age-old food storage questions. Sponsored by Walmart.

Daily food & travel inspiration in your inbox

Coming right up

Daily food & travel inspiration in your inbox

Coming right up

Transcript

- I'm Hilary Duff and in the next three minutes, I'm going to show you how to organize, store and keep your groceries fresh. The journey towards feeding your family fresher, more vibrant foods doesn't end at the checkout line. Once you bring it home, it's up to you to keep it fresh. It's not as simple as throwing things in the fridge but we could definitely start there. Since meat, fish and poultry are the most perishable items, these are the ones you'll want to shove in your ice box the moment you get home from your trip to the grocery store. Don't put meat into Tupperware or store in you own plastic bags because you've removed the meat from its original packaging, it can get exposed to contaminates, leading it to spoil much faster. Your meat products should also be stored in the coldest part of your fridge, which is usually the bottom shelf. If you don't plan on cooking the meat any time soon, wrap it tightly in freezer paper and toss it in the freezer. If available, use a vacuum sealer. When storing eggs, your inclination might be to put them in the door of your fridge, but that's where your fridge's temperature fluctuates the most. Inconsistent temperature levels can cause eggs to spoil faster so keep these on the bottom shelf as well. Milk should be placed away from foods that have strong odors because the milk can actually adopt them. And if odors are hard to get rid of, there's a hack for that too. Put a bowl of oats or activated charcoal in the fridge and odors be gone. Storing produce can get a little bit complicated but I'm going to offer you some simple procedures for handling fresh fruits and vegetables. In the refrigerator, always store fruits and veggies separately. Many fruits produce ethylene gas which can increase the speed at which your vegetables spoil. Here's a quick tip before you lock away your produce, rinse them in a solution of one part white vinegar and 10 parts water, but make sure to completely air dry them before putting them in the fridge because wet produce can actually rot faster. Tomatoes and potatoes shouldn't be refrigerated. Cooling tomatoes actually alters certain genes that are responsible for producing flavor. And when you put potatoes in the fridge, starch converts to sugar which, when cooked, can produce a harmful chemical called acrylamide. Your cupboards are where your foods are most vulnerable to insects and rodents. Store things like pasta, rice, flours and herbs in air-tight mason jars to keep them fresh and pest free. And olive oil should be kept away from light in a dark cupboard because UV rays can break it down. Here are some storage times for the most common non-refrigerated open box food items according to the Pacific Northwest Extension. Got it? Good. We've covered some strategies on how to properly store your groceries to preserve freshness in under three minutes. And it 'kales' me to say our time is up, 'peas' out.

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