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Chef Peter Cho's pork and kimchi dumpling embodies the cuisine of his restaurant Han Oak, one that combines his mother's traditional Korean cooking with his modernized style.

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Transcript

- The pork and kimchi dumpling perfectly reflects our restaurant. It encompasses everything about my cooking style without compromising. My name is Peter Cho and I'm the chef-owner of Han Oak. Han Oak is a hybrid. We're a restaurant four nights a week but it's actually our home. Basically we were able to find a residential rental that we were able to turn into a live-work space. Being that we live inside the restaurant, we don't really have to compromise the live-work gap. Having my mom in the kitchen helps me feel confident in the dishes that we do. As long as she's happy with it I feel like it's as Korean as can be. The pork and kimchi dumpling would definitely be the one of the staple dishes on our menu. It's my mom's traditional kimchi and my cooking background wrapped up in a dumpling. The first step of the process is the the pork and kimchi filling. My mom makes all the kimchi here. She sort of insists on it and won't let me make it. Take the kimchi from the oven and you rough chop the kimchi. The glass noodles are potato starch based vermicelli noodles. To a boiling pot of water you add the glass noodles. Into a food processor you add chives, and garlic. I think it was more like my grandma's style or what she preferred so garlic chive is used in a lot of the dumpling filling that I make. Add soy sauce, rice wine, and then some brown sugar, sesame oil, and salt. Blend on high until it's smooth puree. Transfer the mixture into a large bowl. Add the pork, the kimchi, and the noodles. And then you also add chopped garlic chives and then mix until fully incorporated. Plastic wrap it and put it aside. What we've introduced to the culinary culture here in Portland is an introduction to Korean food. It's definitely given us an opportunity to do things the way we want it and really not have to compromise for any reason. My earliest food memory is eating dumplings. Or at least sitting around the table and making dumplings with my mom. I think a lot of Asian kids can relate to that. Mom makes a big batch of dumpling filling and everybody sits around the table and has to make their share. Place the dumplings on the cabbage and then steam until the skin is slightly translucent and the filling is cooked through. And then you carefully take the dumplings out of the steamer and onto a plate. To finish, you lay sliced chili, garlic, and onion onto each dumpling and then pour the vinegar over. And there you have it. Han Oak's pork and kimchi dumplings. I think people like these dumplings because it gives you two layers of flavor. The warmth of the kimchi and that spice and then there's the fresh chilies and garlic in the vinegar. The texture of the skin is really important too because what you want is it for to be still tender but have a little bit of a chew. This dish embodies what we're doing here at Han Oak because it brings back my childhood memory of cooking with my mom but also to have her as a guide post really keeps us from having to compromise what our food style is gonna be.