Meat Myths Debunked

Meat Myths Debunked

Frankie Celenza

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Does steak need to be cooked through? Will searing lock in moisture? Should you let it sit? These and other questions are answered.

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Transcript

- Steak, there are many myths, legends and things about how to cook it. And today I'm gonna debunk three of 'em. The first thing that I hear that's wrong all the time from people is that they order their steak medium-well because it's safer to eat. We all know that heat kills bacteria. That is 100% true. But cooking a meat through doesn't really make it any safer to eat. Let's say this steak has been sitting out for a couple of days, and this flour represents bacteria. The bacteria starts forming on the steak. It's on the bottom, it's on the top. This flour's bacteria in case you didn't get that drift. What do you notice about all the bacteria on our steak? What do you notice? It's on the outside. The inside of the meat is sterile. Yes, that means you can have a pork chop with a medium-rare center. Yes, that means you can have a chicken breast with a medium-rare center. They do it in Japan. Bacteria is on the outside. We're gonna kill that bacteria with heat by searing it, and the inside is sterile. We are good. All right, and you take your steak, you always wanna put it in the pan, away from you, so that if it splatters it doesn't ruin your life. So! Another myth. Searing the meat seals in the juices. This isn't true. It's true that searing meat makes the flavor more intense because you're getting the Maillard reaction. You're getting caramelized flavors. So maybe that's the illusion of sealing in juices, but the juices don't get sealed in. I'll show you. That's nice. It's pretty nice. Okay. So we sealed in the juices, right? That's a nice sear. Would anyone argue against that? Methinks not. Now watch what happens here. Watch as the moisture from within the steak heats up and gets pushed through the top. You will see little, look I'm seeing 'em already! Little bubbles start to form. If you stare at it you'll just start seeing the moisture come through. So really, the best way to lock in moisture is to not overcook it! Very nice. Something that is definitely, absolutely 100% true is that you should let this hang out for a second. It was hot. Everything's exciting. It's moving around. If you cut into it juices flow out. If you let it sit for a second it starts chilling, the juices start going back into muscle protein, also gravity is pulling moisture to the bottom. So if you flip this every couple minutes or so, you'll reverse the flow of that liquid. And now the obvious thing here is we put a bunch of bacteria, we put flour all over this, where is the flour? Where's the bacteria? And the answer is, it's all been cooked off by high heat. So however you like your steak, one thing's for sure, that's okay. That is rare, baby. There's nothing here though. There's nothing to be worried about. Bacteria comes from the outside. We seared all sides. There's nothing in the middle to worry about, and that is why I'm going to eat this beautiful, rare, piece of steak, without a care in the world. It's moist, it's delicious. So there you have it. You can cook a steak way under what you're used to and not be worried about getting sick because bacteria is on the outside. With the exception of super sketchy meat that's been sitting out for a long time. If you get a high quality piece of meat absolutely sear it. Two, the less you cook it the more moisture will be in the inside. Searing the steak, searing any meat, does not lock in any juices. You saw it. We had a totally dry, seared piece and moisture bubbles just started coming through. This is not a piece of Tyvek Homerack. It is not impermeable. Searing does add flavor, but it does not lock in juices. And then the last thing is rest your steak so when you cut into it juices don't bleed out. Do you notice how nothing's bleeding out here? This is just the olive oil from cooking it. But look. Nothin's comin' out. We rested it well. It's really nice crust. Oh by the way, the flour, really good on a steak. Not only for demonstration purposes but also for getting an even crispier crust. So there you go. Steak myths debunked. Mm!

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