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They don't make cast iron like they used to. Thankfully, Smithey Ironware has forged a stunning skillet, crafted in vintage style. Made of American iron, it should last for generations. Want it? Click Here: http://taste.md/2sqYCcC

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Transcript

- If you were to ask any chef what single skillet or pan they would want to have in their kitchen, they would tell you they want a cast iron skillet, and they'd probably tell you their grandmother's cast iron skillet. My name is Isaac Morton. I'm the founder of Smithey Ironware. It was probably mid to late 1800s when cast iron reached its golden age, so to speak. What distinguished them from modern cast iron today is the surface finish. Surface finish was glossy, it was glassy, it was smooth. It was naturally nonstick. Cast iron evolved over time to the point where it became a little bit over-manufactured, and you started to see pieces that were rough, grainy, sandpaper-like surfaces, and a lot of cooks find that not quite as approachable. They want something that's smooth. They want something that cleans up quickly. We looked at that and said there's nobody creating iron the way they used to create it, and there's not a reason that we shouldn't be doing that. That's what brought us to where we are now. Our foundry takes a mold, and then they pour molten iron into that mold. After the piece is cast, it goes through a cooling down process. It comes out of the mold, and the workers then will take it and grind it. They'll grind all the edges off. They'll grind the underside. They'll grind the handles. From there, it goes to be polished. The second part of that is it comes to our shop, and we polish it further from there. Every piece probably gets, between machine and hand, a good 30 minutes to an hour of polishing. Each piece gets a lot of care to get it where we want it. When our skillets arrive in our customer's kitchens, they are a copper shade, and that's because we're putting two to three coats of seasoning on the surface. From there on, the meals you cook, the oils from your meals and the actual food remnants will, over time, carbonize, and that creates a mature skillet. It's the mark of a mature skillet is a dark, blackened patina. The way we think of seasoning is it is like a coat of paint on your house. You apply seasoning to cast iron to protect it, to create a slick, smooth surface. I have a real interest in cooking a fried egg on a cast iron skillet. It's just sort of the challenge of the morning. I love to cook fried eggs. I love to cook steak. I enjoy searing a steak whether I've baked it in advance and then sear it to finish it or the reverse. Steak and eggs are kinda my go to. There's a lot of mythology around how to clean cast iron. As a rule, it makes sense just to use warm water and a scouring pad or a paper towel. Lightly wipe down the interior surface. Always keep it dry, and, after you use it, apply just a little bit of vegetable oil or any oil that's around the kitchen to its surface just to protect it. I believe what really differentiates us in the biggest way is our surface finish. We spend a lot of time polishing these surfaces, getting these surfaces to a very, very smooth condition. It makes a big difference in quality, and it's easier to clean, and it's more attractive to look at. It's got a lot of versatility, and I think, if there's anything chefs appreciate about cast iron, it's its versatility. When we talk to people about our cast iron, we really try to talk to 'em in terms of generations and decades, because cast iron is timeless. So long as you take basic care of any piece of cast iron, it will last, and it'll become a special heirloom. We're creating a quality product and something that people can be proud of and something that people can enjoy for many generations to come.

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