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From cutting spaghetti to how you hold your utensils to doubling up on your tortillas, you may be doing it wrong.

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Transcript

- These are spaghetti and unfortunately, their dreams have been broken because I broke these spaghetti in half to fit them into the pot. And unfortunately for these spaghettis as well, none of them will feel the gentle caress of a gyrating fork's tine twirling them into what they were meant to be. This is a segment called Foods You're Eating Wrong and I have three things to show you. I've made the mistakes myself too. Let's talk about spaghetti, okay? You have a small pot and you're breaking the spaghetti so that it'll fit in the pot. You can't twirl if you do that. That makes no sense to me. If you refuse to buy a large stockpot, you can cook your spaghetti this way. That's one solution. Please don't break the spaghetti. That's thing number one. Very important to me. Number two, the fork and knife with the spaghetti. Spaghetti is long, it's meant to be twirled. In the south of Italy, they twirl it on a spoon kinda like this. It's a wonderful thing like that. In the north of Italy, they grab some strands and they go like this, do it one-handed. And this is the fun of eating spaghetti. It's twirling. If you cut it or if you break the spaghetti in half before cooking it, you can't twirl it! That makes no sense! So, if you find yourself doing this and you refuse to learn how to do this, I have a solution for you. Don't eat spaghetti. There are hundreds of pasta shapes that don't need to be twirled. Rigatoni, a great option, really. Because if you cut your spaghetti, you're eating it wrong and you're hurting me. A little bit of me dies inside every single time you cut your spaghetti. Just remember that. Next, when you go to the restaurant or you have any fine dining experience, it's forks on the left, knives on the right, right? Yet, the book of etiquette says that we should cut, cut, cut, switch hands and then eat. Eat, eat, eat. Here's the problem I have with that. If you cut up all your food and you're trying to have a conversation, you're probably not eating at the fastest speed and because the food is cut up, it now is cooling and losing moisture faster. I think you should cut to order, no joke. Cut and this feels weird like the first time and then it's not so weird. Just keep these utensils in these hands. Just ah. What do you think? So, the etiquette people might say, "Ah, that's blasphemous." But I say I want the food to be delicious to the last bite. So, if you cut up all the food and then eat it one piece at a time, in my opinion, you're eating it wrong. Tacos, no doubt you've seen the double tortilla taco. Frankie, the primitive taco eater ate it this way thinking it was meant to hold in juices and I quickly realize that things would spill out the back. Then, Frankie the slightly more advanced taco eater realized hey, it's cause they want you to make two tacos out of every single one taco by putting half the ingredients on one side and keeping the other half there. Less filling, less chance of spilling. Frankie, the now slightly more advanced taco eater has learned from Rodrigo that the second tortilla is actually meant to be offset so that when you bite in, the excess pieces catch here, right? So, got second tortilla hanging off, sort of pinch the back and the idea is, those ingredients won't fall out, they start making your secondary taco as you're biting through the primary taco. So, the purpose of this is not really right and wrong. It's more like getting the maximum pleasure that the life can give, to quote my friend Luca. Twirling is a lovely act. Cutting food to order is a fun process. And sliding that second tortilla out is nice, it's intelligent, it was designed to be eaten that way. Remember, it's not just the destination. It's the journey.

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